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Official HMS Victory Cross Section Build Diary - Issues 121 -125 Options
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#1 Posted : 18 July 2012 18:07:15
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Tomick
#2 Posted : 19 July 2012 08:33:23
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HMS Victory cross-section

This unique 1/72 scale cross-section of Admiral Nelson's flagship show's a slice of life on board the premier warship of the Georgian era, and is based on authoritative drawings and reference photographs of the real HMS Victory, to which special access for this project was granted by the Royal Navy.

The section spans the hold, orlop, three gun decks and cockpit/quarterdeck, and includes accurately modelled rib frames showing how these were built up.

Kit Content:

● Interior and exterior hull planking
● Decking, wooden gratings, companionway ladders & pump well
● Stub mast, chainwales, photo-etched brass grates & hammock cranes
● Die-cast metal chain pumps & elm-tree pumps
● Ship's ballast & die-cast metal Entry port canopies
● Provison barrels, shot lockers & cannonballs
● Four die-cast metal 32-pounder cannon & wooden gun carriages
● Four die-cast metal 12-pounder cannon & wooden gun carriages
● Gunners tools, storage chests & hammock netting
● Hammocks & mess tables
● Wooden buckets & pillars
● Gun rigging threads & tackle

Also includes a display stand and photo-etched brass nameplate.

Overall model dimensions: 325mm high (inc stub mast), 220mm wide, 87.5mm deep.

You can construct the cross-section as a natural wood finish, or finish with woodstain and paint to reflect its period colours (not included).

The pump well has an 'open view' section and you also have the option to depict a 'day or night' crew quarters.

The instructions cover the painted option which the official build diary will follow and day option.
Tomick attached the following image(s):
Cross-section.JPG
Tomick
#3 Posted : 22 July 2012 10:45:36
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Issue 121 - Contains the first of the rib frames (2-5), small & large barrels and a rib plan., and has instructions for the assembly of these frames.

The model cross-section is based on seven ribs, and this issue includes parts for the first four, numbered 2-5.
The ribs are built up in sections similar to those used in the real ship, so the first job is to assemble them using the plan provided. This ensures that the joints are correctly aligned. Note that the outer two ribs (the first of which is assembled this time using parts 2, 2a and 2b) are designed to be visible in the finished model. For this reason, these parts have extra etched ‘joint lines’ that correspond to the positions of the jointed futtocks in the real Victory. Although the outer curvature of the frames at this point in the hull is identical, the frames themselves vary. Some of them have gaps at the points where the gun ports and entry points pierce the hull. Those at the back of the quarterdeck (which you will receive in Issue 122) are taller than those at the front. You will also see that some of them have deck supports in different positions, as the positions of the deck beams vary on the real ship. The instructions explain how to use the plan for each rib.

As mentioned earlier, you can either leave the cross-section as natural wood finish or paint it in period colours of black and yellow, with white and red ochre inside and copper below the waterline.
Because much of the construction inside is bare wood, a painted finish shows this off to advantage, so the basic instructions will cover the painted option. If you choose to leave your model natural wood, the instructions will indicate where you need to leave steps out.
Whichever finish you choose, the ribs you are assembling now will be concealed within the planking, so do not need any finish. The only exceptions to this are the outer faces of ribs 2 and 8. These are designed to look like those in the real ship, so they have extra joint lines to represent the individual timbers from which the ribs were made. For either option, these faces will not be painted, although you can give them a light coat of varnish to seal and protect the wood. Inner ribs will be concealed and do not need finishing, while rib #2 is designed to reveal the bare wood construction

Assembling the rib frames - The paper plan provided with this issue is used to assemble all the ribs to ensure that their curvature is identical. You will also need the plan for next issue’s construction, so keep it safe.

You will need a small build board, which needs to be slightly larger than the supplied frame plan. The board needs to be dead flat/without warp, and soft enough to push map/push-pins into, you will also need a small quantity of these pins.
A multiple-section, finger-jointed board is ideal as it is resistant to warp, its fine grain surface and uniform density accepts pins easily. Such a board is generally stocked by model aircraft retailers or you may find a suitable off-cut via a wood merchant. If your board has warp, then this will transfer to your structure build.
A popular Pro-build board is manufactured by "Great Planes", (the smallest size is more than adequate in this instance).
http://www.greatplanes.com/accys/gpmr6946.html


Start by taping the plan to a build board so that it is completely flat, then cover the plan with cling film, this will prevent parts from sticking to the plan as a result of glue seepage.

Carefully cut part #2 from the fret and sand the edges smooth. Pay particular attention to the points where it was joined to the fret, and especially on the edge where parts 2a and 2b are joined. Then do the same for parts 2a and 2b.

Secure part #2 over the plan using the pins, (pin around the parts rather than through them), and ensure that each part is secured flat against the plan/board. Make sure that the etched ‘joint lines’ upon the part are facing upwards.

Try part #2a in place. When you are happy with the fit, apply PVA wood glue to the joint and pin part 2a in place, noting Steps 6 and 7 also. Once again, the etched ‘joint lines’ must face upwards and make sure that the joint is securely pinned together.
Repeat the procedure with part 2b on the other side to finish the ‘U’ shape of the rib. Leave the assembly pinned to the board until the glue has set completely.

Once removed from the board, sand the inner and outer edges of the joints smooth if necessary. If surplus glue has squeezed onto the outer surface, sand it off lightly (the inside face does not matter).

Repeat the assembly process with parts #3, 3a and 3b to make rib frame #3. Note that this frame is shorter in height and stops at the lower gunport.

Repeat the frame assembly parts #4, 4a and 4b. Note that this rib frame does not have any deck support.

Finally, repeat with parts #5, 5a and 5b. Note that this rib frame does not have a deck support for the orlop deck and stops at the middle deck for the entry port.

Mark the ribs with their part numbers for easy identification. Make sure that rib #2 is marked where it will be hidden on the inside of the model – the side that does not have the etched markings.

You should store the completed rib frames on a flat surface to prevent warp. You will assemble the framework after all the ribs are completed, at which point jigs will be provided to make sure the ribs remain correctly spaced all the way up.

That's it for this week. Carefully store any remaining parts/left over material within a parts bag, and label with the issue number.

Future issues:

Issue 122 - Contains rib frames 6, 7 & 8, grating strips and a wood strip., and has instructions for the assembly of these frames.
Tomick attached the following image(s):
X121-1.jpg
X121-2.jpg
X121-3.jpg
X121-4.jpg
X121-5.jpg
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X121-8.jpg
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Tomick
#4 Posted : 30 July 2012 08:03:40
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Issue 122 - Contains rib frames 6, 7 & 8, grating strips and a wood strip., and has instructions for the assembly of frames 6, 7 and 8.

The parts provided with this issue are the second set of rib frames on which the cross-section is based, plus gratings strips which will be used later on to make up some of the gratings that were fitted to ventilate the lower decks.

Assembling the rib frames - Take the plan that you used in Issue 121 and replace the cling film if it has been damaged or torn.

Remove and prepare the parts as before, then pin the lower section of frame 6 over the centre of the plan. (The upper sections of the shorter ribs are provided with Issue 123).

Glue and pin parts 6a and 6b in place and pin or clamp the joints. Wipe off any excess glue and allow to dry. Note that this frame stops at the middle deck entry port and does not have the upper two deck supports.

Repeat with parts 7, 7a and 7b to make frame #7. Note that this frame stops at the lower deck gun port.

Repeat with parts 8, 8a and 8b, which form a full frame with all the deck support brackets in place. Like rib 2, it is visible at the end of the model. Make sure that the etched ‘joint lines’ are facing upwards.

Sand all the frame joints smooth around the inside and outside of the curves. If any glue has squeezed onto the face of rib 8, make sure you only sand this very lightly so as not to damage the etched ‘joint lines’.

Mark the ribs with their part numbers for easy identification. Make sure that rib number 8 is marked where it will be hidden on the inside of the model (on the side that does not have the etched markings).

That's it for this week, store the grating & wood strip, and carefully store the frames flat to avoid them warping.

Future issues:

Issue 123 - Contains thread, wooden buckets, dowels and framework parts., and has instructions for assembling the keel and keelson and the framework.

Issue 124 - Contains grating strips, planking and a wood strip.

Tomick attached the following image(s):
X 122-1.jpg
X 122-2.jpg
X122-3.jpg
Tomick
#5 Posted : 03 August 2012 09:10:06
Rank: Administration

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Issue 123 - Contains thread, wooden buckets, dowels and framework parts., and has instructions for assembling the keel, keelson and the framework.

This issue’s parts include short sections that extend the ribs above the ports. You also have the key components that link the ribs together – the keel that fits below them and the keelson that fits above them.
It is important to assemble everything squarely, so the dowels are used to hold the ribs in position while you plank them inside and out, and the temporary spacers will set the correct spacing while you fit the dowels. Note that (as on the real ship) the ribs are not evenly spaced but are positioned where they are needed for structural strength.

Don't discard the fret from this issue, as it will make a useful temporary brace when you attach the planking in the next stage.

Assembling the keel and keelson - Start by assembling the keel and keelson, parts 10 and 11, supplied this issue.
Separate the two halves of the keel and sand off any marks left where they were joined to the fret. Glue the faces together with a thin coat of PVA glue. Make sure the two parts are perfectly aligned and clamp the halves together.

Glue the two halves of the keelson together in a similar way. Allow the glue to dry thoroughly, then sand the charring (laser ash) off the ends of the keel and keelson, as they will be visible in the finished model. It is not necessary to sand the long edges.

Assembling the framework - Let the keel and keelson dry fully, then use them and the dowel rods supplied to join all the rib frames you have assembled. Use the spacer jigs supplied to ensure that everything is in the correct position.

Glue rib 2 to the keel, which fits on the end closest to the double slots, and the engraved joint lines must face outwards.
Make sure the frame is exactly vertical and also square to the keel and fully seated in the slot. Allow the glue to dry thoroughly before continuing.

Glue rib 3 to the keel. Use the spacer jigs supplied to make sure that the spacing at the top of the frame is correct, and ensure that the holes in both ribs are aligned so that the dowels can pass through them easily later on, and again ensure that the frame is fully seated in its slot.

Add ribs 4 to 8 in the same way. The engraved lines on rib 8 must face outwards.

Glue the keelson over the ribs and on top of the keel. (Don’t worry about the visible part numbers as they will be covered by the "limber plank" later in the build).

Cut a 94mm length of dowel and feed it through the lowest holes. Use a jig to ensure the frames are correctly spaced, and then glue the dowel in position, (apply a drop of superglue to each joint. Capillary action will draw the glue into the joint).
Then repeat on the other side of the model.

Cut two more 94mm lengths of dowel and select parts 3c and 7c. (These two parts are identical.) Push the dowels through the next rows of holes in the frames, slipping parts 3c and 7c into place as you do so. These
parts are positioned directly above the main frames 3 and 7.

Insert two spacer jigs at the top and bottom of the newly added sections of frame to gauge the spacing. Then glue the lower dowel in place. Do not glue the upper dowel just yet.
Repeat on the other side of the model with parts 3d and 7d. Allow the glue to dry completely before continuing.

Cut another 94mm length of dowel and take parts 5c and 6c. Remove the upper dowel that you left unglued earlier. Then replace it, sliding on parts 5c and 6c in the appropriate places over ribs 5 and 6. Now insert the new dowel in the next hole up. Gauge the spaces with the jigs and then glue the lower dowel in place. Do not glue the upper dowel yet.
Repeat on the other side of the model with parts 5d and 6d, and allow the glue to dry thoroughly before continuing.

Take parts 3e, 4c and 7e. Take care to get 3e the right way round, so it slopes the same way as the others. You will also need another 94mm length of dowel, then fit the dowels through the three frame parts as shown. Use a jig to make sure the spacing is correct, then glue both dowels in place.
Repeat on the other side of the model and allow the glue to dry thoroughly.

Carefully sand the projecting ends of the dowels flush with the faces of ribs 2 and 8 to complete the framework.

Don't discard what remains of the fret, as it will make a useful temporary brace when you attach the planking in the next stage. Roughly cut one end of the fret as shown, and glue a scrap of wood across the gap to stiffen it. Allow the glue to dry before using the fret as a brace.

That's it for this week. Carefully store the frame, remaining material and parts.

Future issues:

Issue 124 - Contains grating strips, planking and a wood strip.

Tomick attached the following image(s):
X123-1.jpg
X123-2.jpg
X123-3.jpg
X123-4.jpg
X123-5.jpg
X123-6.jpg
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X123-8.jpg
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X123-19.jpg
Tomick
#6 Posted : 22 August 2012 10:39:24
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Issue 124 - Contains grating strips, planking and a wood strip., and has instructions for bracing the framework and starting the outer planking.

Bracing the framework - It’s important to make sure that the upper ends of the ribs stay in alignment while you add the planks, so start by fixing a temporary brace across the top.

Take the piece of fret that you saved from Issue 123 (see Quick Tip, page 13). The brace is just the right width to fit flush across the uppermost deck brackets on both sides of the ribs.

Tape it across the open top of the framework, making sure that the flat edge lines up perfectly with rib 8 at both sides. This will act as a brace to ensure that the frame does not twist.

Starting the outer planking - The planks supplied are sufficient for planking the bottom of the hull up to the level of the gun ports on the lower gun deck. Planks above this level will not be continuous, as they are cut around the gun and entry ports.

As the ribs are thin and narrow, pinning through the planks would likely split them. The method used is slower, because you need to allow the glue to dry, but you will get a much neater result.

Cut a piece of 2x5mm plank long enough to overhang the outer ribs by a couple of millimetres (about 93-94mm long). Chamfer the inner edge so that it sits flat against the keel.
Apply wood glue to the ribs and the edge of the plank and glue it in place adjacent to the keel. Hold it in place by pushing pins into the ribs to trap the edge of the plank at an angle. Working this close to the keel, you will find it easier to use dressmaking pins or fine glassbead head modelling pins.

Ensure the pins don’t split the ribs – especially the outer faces of ribs 2 and 8, and be sure to apply glue to the edges of the planks as well as the ribs.

Remove any excess glue immediately, especially in the angle between the keel and the plank. You can add a matching plank on the other side of the keel, but allow the glue on these strips to dry before continuing the planking.
Continue to apply more planks to the outside of the hull in the same way. You will need to chamfer the edges of the planks where they go round the curve of the hull.
Continue to apply planks on both sides of the hull until you have a plank that overlaps the top of ribs 3 and 7, which form the bottom of the lower gun port.

When the glue is thoroughly dry, sand the ends of the planks flush with the faces of ribs 2 and 8. Be careful not to sand the ribs themselves. To support the model while you sand the side of rib 8, you can either temporarily remove the brace or allow the projecting end of the brace to overhang the edge of your worktop.

That completes the planking on the outside of the cross-section up to the level of the lower gun deck ports.

That's it for this stage, carefully store the grating strips until later on in the build, when you will use them to make the ventilation grids fitted in each deck, also store the small wood strip, along with any remaining planking material.

Future issues:

Issue 125 - Contains assorted wood strips., and has instructions for planking the hold.

Issue 126 - Contains wood strips, assorted threads, buckets & small barrels, mast step parts and the stub mast dowel., and has instructions to extend the planking up the rib frames.
Tomick attached the following image(s):
X124-1.jpg
X124-2.JPG
X124-3.JPG
X124-3.JPG
X124-4.JPG
X124-5.JPG
X124-6.JPG
X124-7.JPG
X124-8.JPG
Tomick
#7 Posted : 22 August 2012 17:49:28
Rank: Administration

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Joined: 08/03/2010
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Issue 125 - Contains assorted wood strips., and has instructions for planking the hold.

Planking the hold - With the first of the outer planks in place, you can turn to planking the lower area inside the hull, which will form the hold. The planking here is slightly more complex, as the thickness of the timber varies and there is also a drainage channel along the bilges. The wood supplied includes a veneer for finishing off the keelson.

You need to leave a 3mm gap in the planking either side of the keelson to form the drainage channel known as the limber passage. Cut two 93mm lengths of 1.5 x 5mm strip and place them on edge against the keelson as temporary spacers. (They will be used again later).

Cut a 93mm length of 2 x 5mm wood and glue it to the frames alongside the spacers from Step 1, being careful not to glue the spacers in place. Pin the strip in position and allow the glue to dry thoroughly, then remove the spacers.

Repeat the above on the other side of the model, using the same spacers. The strips can be recycled later to plank the hull, so don’t discard them after removal.

Glue another two strips of 2x5mm wood to each side.

Using 1.5mm strips, continue to plank the rest of the hold in the same way as you planked the outside of the hull.
Continue planking until there is a gap of between 5 and 10mm between the top plank and the bottom of the deck supports. This gap will be filled in later.

Sand the ends of the planks flush with the frames. Be careful not to sand the frames themselves as you could remove the laser-etched joint lines.

Sand the top of the keelson to remove most of the laser charring.

Cut a strip of 8 x 0.6mm wood veneer just longer than the forward section of the keelson.

Apply a very thin, even smear of PVA glue to the bottom of the veneer, and another one to the top of the keelson. Place the veneer in position and press it down firmly until the glue grabs. (If you apply too much glue, its water content will make the veneer curl and lift at the sides).

Repeat the process to glue the aft veneer in place.

Carefully sand the inside of the hold. You can use a sanding block for the flat areas by the keel, but you will have to use sandpaper on its own for the concave areas of the hold.
Be careful not to bevel the step between the 2mm and 1.5mm planks.
You can choose to leave the planks unsanded, which will give a more rustic appearance to the model.

That's it for this stage, carefully store the remaining wood strips.

Future issues:

Issue 126 - Contains wood strips, assorted threads, buckets & small barrels, mast step parts and the stub mast dowel, and has instructions to extend the planking up the rib frames.
Tomick attached the following image(s):
X125-1.jpg
X125-2.JPG
X125-3.JPG
X125-4.JPG
X125-5.JPG
X125-6.JPG
X125-7.JPG
X125-8.JPG
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