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The Chindit Options
godan61
#101 Posted : 29 October 2018 20:51:33

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Liking the realism of the straps and pouches very nice
Plymouth57
#102 Posted : 04 November 2018 16:07:21

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Many thanks for that Godan!BigGrin Stop Press Update! Just made the first resin casting of the left hand (and what he's holding in it), now I have to work on that casting to remodel the wrist and item before making a second final mould, but now I know the casting procedure will work as intended. That just leaves the right hand/arm and some straps to be part of the final torso mould (oh, and I've gone back and re-modeled an earlier part for a much improved look - more on that later!)

Before starting the creation of the Basic Pouches, Photo 6 illustrates the new source of self-adhesive lead sheet that I discovered on Ebay. The 35 year old DecraLed strip is seen above with the slightly thicker wide lead sheet on the left. The glue on the DecraLed is as good today as it was when new!Cool
The first job was to measure the dimensions of the actual Pouch and multiply them by 0.16 to reduce the dimensions down to 1/6th scale. These were then used to mark out a template in thin card as shown in Photo 7. Then I took the whole of the stainless steel mesh sheet that I’d previously cut off the thin strip from for embossing the DecraLed and, using the metal roller, embossed a big enough area of the wide sheet lead to cover the template. The template was placed over this and the edges scribed into the lead with a stylus (actually a blunted knife blade) before using a ‘proper’ knife to cut out the shape as seen on the right in the photo. I also cut and sanded a wooden block as seen above which would be used as a solid former to press and shape the lead around. Before starting the shaping, I also scribed the bend lines into the front face of the embossed sheet and also from behind to simulate the heavy stitched borders that appear all around the webbing sections. The basic box shape is shown being folded up in Photo 8 and you can make out the pre-scored fold lines up the side. With the two sides and bottom folded up into place I then had to very carefully solder the sides to the bottom, trying to again simulate the sewn edges with the solder. This is shown in Photo 9 before the excess solder was filed back a little. This had to be done with as little heat as possible – just enough to melt the solder and run it along the join, not enough to suddenly melt the whole darned thing! Once the sides and bottom were secured I then had to remove a strip of the brown backing paper from the two halves of the back panel to enable a scrap piece of lead to fix them together as illustrated in Photo 10. I did then try to solder the rear join – the less said about that attempt the better! I learnt from that however and on the second Pouch I removed all the backing paper from the inside rear and applied a full width inner strip instead. I was going to ditch the first one (now with a sizeable hole in the back) but managed to salvage it in the end by fitting a ‘patch’ over the hole and giving the second one a matching section to compensate.
The final task with the wooden block still inside was to add the front bottom re-enforcing panel as shown in Photo 11 along with the remainder of that embossed strip waiting to go on the number two Pouch. You’ll also notice the rubber strip pushed down into the hollow Pouch. This was a scrap piece cut off a larger mould whilst making the locating lugs for its second half and with a little trimming was a nice tight fit inside the Pouch. Having made the nice smart ‘box’ it was of course far too neat and tidy for an ‘in use’ example. With the rubber pushed down inside to support the lead box I reached for the little Jeweller’s Hammer and proceeded to beat the merry hell out of it until the sides, bottom and front were all misshapen to varying degrees. This is more evident in Photo 12 where the next step is under way. The Pouches will fit on to the figure by way of a hole in the back and a locating peg on the torso. In order to drill the holes I’d need a solid Pouch so in this photo both of the hammered Pouches are filled with resin and waiting for it to cure. Whilst that was happening I carried on with the top opening lids of the Pouches. Basically the same procedure with a card template used to produce the embossed lead sheet as shown in Photo 13 followed by carefully soldering the joints again as seen in Photo 14. Once the joints were fixed I removed all the backing paper from the inside, placed the lid over the Pouch body and bent down the rear flap to stick the lid in place as shown in Photo 15.
Before finally securing top to bottom with super glue, the lids also received a bit of abuse from the hammer to match up with the body.
As mentioned earlier, these Pouch lids are secured with a brass snap fastener and just to mark the two pouches apart I thought I’d do one secured and the other loose as shown in Photo 16. The same lead sheet provided the two straps with stitching added with a sewing needle (the lines of stitching on the rest of the Pouch was with a Pounce Wheel set made by Trumpeter). The brass snap fasteners were a pair of large headed brass pin nails tapped down into pre-drilled holes and the fixed ‘eye’ or whatever its called was made by tapping one of my smaller paper/leather punches from the set I bought building the Pup. A close up of the un-fastened strap and eye is shown in Photo 17.
The pair of Pouches is seen attached to the main body in Photo 18. Each Pouch is secured (sort of) with a locating peg and hole. A hole was drilled through the lead belt and right through the resin torso directly in line with the brace running down the chest. Into this was glued a 2.5mm styrene rod which protrudes about 5mm out from the belt. A corresponding 2.7mm hole was drilled into the rear of the Pouch into which the peg fits. Why not a 2.5mm hole? I tried that! It seems the resin tends to compress around the drill bit, even though at this stage it’s completely rigid, and then expands back once the bit is removed. A 2.5mm hole should accept a 2.5mm rod – but it doesn’t!Blink A 2.7mm hole will just accept the rod (but it’s still a bit tight for the first few fittings). It does eventually loosen off a bit though. Now back to the real Pouch, Photo 19 is a close up of that flap and buckle on the rear. The buckle is a three-barred device (see Photo 22) and is attached to the rear flap by the centre bar. The brace strap passes down through the open ended bar, passes over the Pouch strap and exits through the bottom section as shown in Photo 19. Now since I’m trying to create this whole thing in resin, I didn’t want to waste Richard Elbourne’s beautiful etched brass buckles so I looked for a way to replicate them in resin first. I did try a silicone mould but completely messed the thing up by forgetting which way round the mould had to be – I ended up with a nice set of silicone buckles – not the mould to cast them with!Blushing
By a happy accident I discovered the easiest way to cast the buckles was also the simplest – I just pressed the PE set down into a flat bed of soft plasticene, carefully lifted the brass out and then mixed up a little of the resin. This was poured over the entire block and using a wooden mixing stick I simply scraped off the excess resin until just the shapes were filled with the thinnest of skins over the rest of the block as illustrated in Photo 20. Once the resin cured I was left with the standalone casting shown in Photo 21. The plasticene block is in such a good condition that I could probably do another one if I wanted without making another mould – these are more than I need for this model though! The first buckle I require for the Pouch is outlined in Photo 21 and shown in close up in Photo 22.
In the next instalment the buckles are cut out and prepared and the braces adapted to create the second location point for the Pouches which now also need to be made in resin of course.
Until then, Happy Modelling to you All!

Robin.
Plymouth57 attached the following image(s):
Basic Pouch Pic 3.JPG
Basic Pouch Pic 4.JPG
Basic Pouch Pic 5.JPG
First wooden ship: The Grimsby 12 Gun 'Frigate' by Constructo Second: Bounty DelPrado Part Works Third: HMS Victory DelPrado Part Works 1/100 scale
Diorama of the Battle of the Brandywine from the American Revolutionary War Diorama of the Battle of New Falkland (unfinished sci-fi), Great War Centenary Diorama of the Messines Ridge Assault
Index for the Victory diary is on page 1
Tomick
#103 Posted : 04 November 2018 18:36:38
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Robin, can you please reduce the volume of text per update, it’s become excessive for a single post., Perhaps split it into two or three posts.
Thanks
Plymouth57
#104 Posted : 04 November 2018 21:28:53

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Will do! I had a feeling that one should have been split up too!Blushing

Robin
First wooden ship: The Grimsby 12 Gun 'Frigate' by Constructo Second: Bounty DelPrado Part Works Third: HMS Victory DelPrado Part Works 1/100 scale
Diorama of the Battle of the Brandywine from the American Revolutionary War Diorama of the Battle of New Falkland (unfinished sci-fi), Great War Centenary Diorama of the Messines Ridge Assault
Index for the Victory diary is on page 1
Plymouth57
#105 Posted : 13 November 2018 18:58:16

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Carrying on from last time, the first of the resin buckles has been cut away from the fret and cleaned up with sandpaper and files. The Pouch rear flap has been formed from the lead sheet and is composed of a wedge shaped section to which is glued a length of the standard webbing strip. Once dry, this was carefully threaded through the buckle and back under the central bar as seen in Photos 23 and 24. After all that careful threading the strip was then cut off level with the bottom of the buckle whilst the portion coming around the top of the buckle was also sliced away as shown in Photo 25. Nearly forgot – this was done after the lead strip had been fixed in place with super glue! I had to remove that small piece in order to allow the buckle to sit flat against the torso, in the final mould it will be part of the torso and not the Pouch.
I next had to slice across the previously fitted webbing strap to both allow the buckle into place and also to slightly trim back the shoulder strap and insert it into the top of the buckle. The positioning cut is shown in Photo 26, as mentioned earlier, the right hand strap came off whilst I was trying to insert it into the buckle so I gently pulled this one off too after this photo was taken. The first one is shown glued into position in Photo 27 with the lead and resin Pouch fitted in place, held there by the hole in the rear and the ‘butt’ joint under the buckle and flap.
With that done I could now create the silicone moulds for both the Pouches as illustrated in Photo 28. Due to the weight of the lead prototypes I could just lightly push them into the plasticene with the first pouring of rubber creating a very deep mould and the second a shallow impression of the rear. Then came the casting! Photo 29 shows three attempts in order from left to right. The first was simply poured in and the mould halves placed together. As you can make out, there was a small issue of tiny air bubbles on the edges of the front details. On the second attempt I used a cocktail stick to run along those edges after the resin was poured which gave a much cleaner finish. Unfortunately as you can see we have major issues with flaming great air bubbles on the rear faces of both of them!Blink The lighter version on the right doesn’t have those bubbles but took too long a time to create – this is in fact the hollow casting Roto resin which does work, but I was there rotating the mould for nearly half an hour before I could check it to find out if it had worked.
As we’ll find in the next instalment, I found a way around the problem, which didn’t involve all that effort!BigGrin

Until then, Happy Modelling to you All!

Robin.
Plymouth57 attached the following image(s):
Basic Pouch Pic 6.JPG
First wooden ship: The Grimsby 12 Gun 'Frigate' by Constructo Second: Bounty DelPrado Part Works Third: HMS Victory DelPrado Part Works 1/100 scale
Diorama of the Battle of the Brandywine from the American Revolutionary War Diorama of the Battle of New Falkland (unfinished sci-fi), Great War Centenary Diorama of the Messines Ridge Assault
Index for the Victory diary is on page 1
ian smith
#106 Posted : 13 November 2018 21:24:48

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looking stunning Robin.Cool BigGrin
Current builds.Hachettes build the bismark,HMS Victory, HMS Hood.
Finished Builds Corel HMS Victory cross section.
Markwarren
#107 Posted : 14 November 2018 09:03:39

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Nice work Robin.Cool

Mark
Plymouth57
#108 Posted : 16 November 2018 16:02:24

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Many thanks as ever to Ian and Mark! Things are progressing well other than a couple of re-moulds as the first ones were probably too ambitious (tried to cast too much in a single go!)Blushing The next week should see the final moulds and castings and then the fun starts with the construction and painting!Blink
So to finish the Basic Pouches...

Diagram 30 illustrates the usual way of casting the resin in a simple two-part mould. The deeper mould is filled up with resin until it is just overflowing the top of the mould and the upper mould is placed on top. Unfortunately this results in any air bubbles contained in the resin from the mixing joining together and rising to the top of the mould as shown in Diagram 31, leading to the result shown in Photo 32. Instead of trying to remove the problem entirely, my solution involved literally turning the problem on its head! The first operation involves partly filling the deep mould, at the same time probing around the details with the cocktail stick to remove any tiny air bubbles as before, shown in Diagram 33. This first pouring is then allowed to cure completely before then filling the rest of the mould up to the top as in Diagram 34, again, just to the point of overflowing before adding the top of the mould on. Now came the sneaky part – the entire mould is then inverted upside down. Any air bubbles (and there’s bound to be some) will still rise to the surface, but now the surface is actually the rear of the previously cured resin so any bubbles will be safely contained within the casting, not on the outside face of it as shown in Diagram 35. I haven’t found this method described anywhere else so I’ve proudly named it as Robin’s Hydrodynamic Inversion Casting Technique!BigGrin
The results are shown in Photo 36 which, despite a couple of tiny bubbles in the front of the Pouches caused by not cocktail sticking carefully enough, are much better than the first attempts. Finally, Photo 37 shows the two finished Basic Pouches attached to the torso. Once again, they are just held there by the two pegs and the top attachments – no glue required yet!
In the next instalment, the piece I am so far most pleased with – the scratch built Pattern ’37 Water Bottle!

Until then, Happy Modelling to you All!

Robin
Plymouth57 attached the following image(s):
Basic Pouch Pic 7.JPG
Basic Pouch Pic 8.JPG
First wooden ship: The Grimsby 12 Gun 'Frigate' by Constructo Second: Bounty DelPrado Part Works Third: HMS Victory DelPrado Part Works 1/100 scale
Diorama of the Battle of the Brandywine from the American Revolutionary War Diorama of the Battle of New Falkland (unfinished sci-fi), Great War Centenary Diorama of the Messines Ridge Assault
Index for the Victory diary is on page 1
Markwarren
#109 Posted : 16 November 2018 16:39:47

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Nice work again Robin. Glad you’ve got the bubbles under wrapLOL

Mark
godan61
#110 Posted : 18 November 2018 19:47:29

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Coming together nicely but getting awfully close to that deadline with so much to do but looking great.
Plymouth57
#111 Posted : 19 November 2018 21:45:45

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Many thanks to Mark and Godan! Don't I know it! Just checked the dates again and it closes a few days before I thought it did!BlinkAnyway...

Photo 1 shows the actual Pattern 1937 Water Bottle complete with its ‘cage’ style webbing carrier. This was another good bargain off Ebay along with the various other webbing straps and bits. The cage carrier is the early version from the beginning of the war, there was a second type consisting of a simple canvas bag with the two straps either side although the troops didn’t like it much as it was so tight you had to release the whole thing from the webbing to get a drink. Somewhere, I still have the Action Man water bottle version of this – I’ve got the cage carrier but no sign of the bottle! To be honest though I’ve gained more satisfaction from scratch building the entire thing than I would have got from building on the Palitoy original.BigGrin
Photos 2 and 3 show the basic shape of the water bottle formed from a small block of scrap wood cut to the 1/6th scale of the original. The front and back faces aren’t flat but curved, convex on the outside and concave on the inside to fit against the body. Once I’d sanded those down I then rounded off the sides and used two sizes of metal tubing to form the neck of the bottle as seen in Photo 4. The reason there’s two tubes is that I didn’t have a drill bit to match the bigger one but did for the smaller! I had tried to chamfer the top of the wooden block but actually found it much easier to form the slope up to the neck in Milliput, cutting off a slice of wood from the bottom to compensate for the little extra on top. The finished basic form of the bottle is shown in Photo 5. The next step was to pinch one of the Victory’s sub-standard spars to stick down the neck as illustrated in Photo 6. This is dual purpose – I now have a handle to hold the bottle with and once cut back, I have the cork as well! Now came the messy bit. To create the felt material effect I painted the bottle up to the metal neck with the metal leaf size, which I originally bought back on Frederick’s armour build. When it was nice and tacky the bottle was dipped into the beach sand which was used on the Cook’s cannon diorama as shown in Photo 7. Once dry, the cork/handle was masked off and the sandy water bottle sprayed over with Poundland Grey Primer to produce the finish shown in Photo 8. (Actually I think I varnished it first with acrylic clear varnish to seal the surface)Blushing . Then I could begin to create the webbing cage using the same lead strip suitably embossed together with a brass strap end by Richard Elbourne, you can just see the tip of it in Photo 9. Photo 10 shows the bottom cross strap before gluing in place and trimming to size. As you’ll see in the next part, I originally designed the suspension side straps to run from the bottom of the bottle but this got altered to make the casting easier. But to end this instalment, Photo 11 shows one of the problem undercuts caused by the multi-layered straps. I can’t have the rubber going under there in the mould so in the bottom part the gap is filled in with Milliput again.
In the next instalment, creating the webbing straps to support the water bottle on the figure.
Until then, Happy Modelling to you All!

Robin.
Plymouth57 attached the following image(s):
Pattern '37 Water Bottle Pic 1.JPG
Pattern '37 Water Bottle Pic 2.JPG
First wooden ship: The Grimsby 12 Gun 'Frigate' by Constructo Second: Bounty DelPrado Part Works Third: HMS Victory DelPrado Part Works 1/100 scale
Diorama of the Battle of the Brandywine from the American Revolutionary War Diorama of the Battle of New Falkland (unfinished sci-fi), Great War Centenary Diorama of the Messines Ridge Assault
Index for the Victory diary is on page 1
Markwarren
#112 Posted : 19 November 2018 22:32:45

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Nice work Robin, looking very good.

Mark
Gandale
#113 Posted : 20 November 2018 00:25:02

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Looking great Robin, beautifully done....Drool Drool

Regards

Alan
Sticky Wickett
#114 Posted : 20 November 2018 11:44:15

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Very nice work Robin. Love the water bottle effect!Love

Regards,
Phil W.
Completed projects: 1/43 scale Bedford HA van / 1/43 scale MG TD sports car
Current projects: 1/48 scale U-boat [U230]
Future projects: 1/148 scale railway diorama / 1/50 scale R/C Volvo F89 logging truck / 1/148 scale Thunderbirds Fireflash
Plymouth57
#115 Posted : 23 November 2018 21:45:44

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Many thanks as usual to Mark, Alan and Phil! Last few parts now before I make up the main head/torso mould (hopefully this weekend if all goes well). Now to finish the water bottle...

The supporting straps for the water bottle were once again made up from the embossed lead strip with resin buckles cut out of the cheapie plasticene mould fret together with the PE brass strap ends. Photo 12 shows the first attempt at casting which, although pretty successful in this instance proved very difficult to replicate again and again. The first attempt is shown attached to the water bottle prototype in Photo 13, held in place by the two moulded on pins, one just up from the bottom and the other through the webbing strap running around the bottle itself. Because of the casting problems I decided to re-design this part by removing the section with the lower pin as shown in Photo 14. A new section of webbing strap was attached to the bottle and the lead original shortened as seen here. Because of where the strap is attached to the torso (under the Basic Pouch) it has to have a complex curve both up from the buckle and sideways as well. Since the ‘all in one’ mould didn’t work out, the new one was designed with a wedge shape plasticine support illustrated on the mould base in Photo 15. After building up the lego mould box the silicone was poured in creating the first half of the mould. Once cured, the plasticine, including the wedge was removed and the second half of the mould poured. Now to cast the part I pour a quantity of resin into the deep hole, probe around with a cocktail stick to get the resin into the buckle and strap end impressions and then push the mould together squeezing out any excess resin. Apart from the odd bubble now and again the results are pretty good. The lead prototype for the other strap is shown in front and back in Photo 16. Unlike the first one, this does have two locating pins as seen here. It also has an extra buckle up the top end, as this one is located at the join of the braces and belt. As mentioned earlier, the buckle is actually part of the belt but I’m using it as the joining lug for the strap! This one had a plasticine wedge in the mould too, but nowhere near as steep or large (thank goodness!) The mould for the water bottle itself is seen ready for the second half in Photo 17 with the resin casting in the completed mould under way in Photo 18. This is similar to the ‘hidden bubble’ technique again, the left hand mould is filled to the top whilst the right hand one is half full. When both are cured the right hand one is then filled to overflowing and the other half placed on top trapping the bubbles inside. The results are seen in Photos 19 to 21 with the resin water bottle beside the prototype, fitted with one resin and one original strap and finally with both the cast resin straps push-fitted in place. Also in Photo 19 you can see the extra parts on the cork top, Two plasticard disks were punched out of a sheet, the larger forming the metal top on the cork and the smaller, after having been drilled through the centre and cut in half makes the loop for the retaining cord. The brass snap-fastener is another large headed brass nail tapped into a pre-drilled hole just like the Basic Pouches had.
In the next instalment: completing his left arm!Cool
Until then, Happy Modelling to you All!

Robin
Plymouth57 attached the following image(s):
Pattern '37 Water Bottle Pic 3.JPG
Pattern '37 Water Bottle Pic 4.JPG
First wooden ship: The Grimsby 12 Gun 'Frigate' by Constructo Second: Bounty DelPrado Part Works Third: HMS Victory DelPrado Part Works 1/100 scale
Diorama of the Battle of the Brandywine from the American Revolutionary War Diorama of the Battle of New Falkland (unfinished sci-fi), Great War Centenary Diorama of the Messines Ridge Assault
Index for the Victory diary is on page 1
Gandale
#116 Posted : 24 November 2018 00:46:02

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Love the detail, wonderful work....Drool Drool

Regards

Alan
Plymouth57
#117 Posted : 25 November 2018 21:39:40

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Many thanks for that Alan!Blushing

The last time we saw the left arm it was just as seen in Photo 1. Unlike the right arm, which I had intended to cast in one piece, the left would be a two parter with the forearm joined to the hand at the wrist. This would be accomplished by giving the figure a wristwitch to cover the joint!Cool Using examples of WW2 British Military watches (which are pretty much identical to modern examples anyway) I drew out the basic outline of the watch onto plasticard as shown in Photo 2. This was carefully trimmed back with razor blade cuts and finally sanded and filed to produce the slightly convex shape seen in Photo 3. Once the shape was right the watch was super glued to the wrist, half on and half off so the lead strip embossed watchstrap seen below in Photo 4 could be super glued around the wrist creating the join. The buckle in the strap was simply formed by bending a thin brass wire into a squared ‘U’ shape which fits snugly over the strap with a thinned down piece of the lead watchstrap glued on to represent the ‘overlapping’ end. When all was set and dry a mould was made up around the resin arm as shown in Photo 5 and the resultant casting shown with the two mould halves in Photo 6. The first casting went well as shown here, as usual the subsequent attempts gave problems with under-estimating the amount of resin required and air bubbles resulting. So I made a slight alteration to the mould, cutting a pouring hole into the bicep end of the uppermost mould, avoiding the locating hole peg in the other half. I now pour resin into the deeper mould, place the two parts together and stand it on end allowing the resin to collect at the wrist. Once cured, I then fill up the remaining empty part by pouring more resin in through the added pouring hole – with good results each time!
With the forearm completed, I could move on to the hand. For his left hand I was using one of the set of action figure hands I’d got on Ebay. The hands that came with the figure were sort of ‘general purpose’ (a bit like the old Action Man ones) able to grip a little but with the trigger finger out (for obvious reasons). I actually made the right hand first, and that one was poseable with moving fingers, for this one however I used the hand shown in Photo 7, with a close up of the grip in Photo 8. This hand is a sort of memory plastic, flexible enough to grip larger items and then returning to an open fist when removed. The item being held is a natural hazel wood stick, part of a small pet hammock type toy sold for ferrets and gnawing animals. I cut this one free from the hammock (one of the straighter examples) and trimmed it to size. Unlike the right hand this one fits the ‘accessory’ perfectly, with no gaps which needed filling in. The mould and first casting are shown in Photos 9 and 10 but once again, this is a multi-stage mould and this casting is just the basis for the extra details to be added onto.
In the next instalment, adding those details, and finishing off the hand’s wrist ready for inserting into the forearm.
Until then, Happy Modelling to you All!

Robin.
Plymouth57 attached the following image(s):
Left arm and hand pic 1.JPG
Left arm and hand pic 2.JPG
First wooden ship: The Grimsby 12 Gun 'Frigate' by Constructo Second: Bounty DelPrado Part Works Third: HMS Victory DelPrado Part Works 1/100 scale
Diorama of the Battle of the Brandywine from the American Revolutionary War Diorama of the Battle of New Falkland (unfinished sci-fi), Great War Centenary Diorama of the Messines Ridge Assault
Index for the Victory diary is on page 1
Kev the Modeller
#118 Posted : 27 November 2018 21:33:17

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Fabulous work as always Robin, I have been watching this build with great interest and you are fast becoming a master at this resin casting skill - very well done, looking really good. ThumpUp

Kev Smile
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Markwarren
#119 Posted : 27 November 2018 23:39:09

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Great work as usual Robin.Cool

Mark
Plymouth57
#120 Posted : 28 November 2018 18:52:28

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Grateful thanks to Kev the Modeller and Mark as always! As to being a Master at this resin lark, I'll be happy being 'experienced' once I can cast perfect copies more often than 'not so perfect' ones! At the moment its about 50/50 BUT, I'm getting quite good at cutting the bad bits off and replacing them with good bits off another bad one!Blink BigGrin

To complete the left hand assembly the first task was to wind a length of my thinnest solder around the cast resin branch as shown in Photo 11. This is because the Chindit isn’t grasping a big wooden branch, he’s holding onto a thick bamboo cane! I have an old bamboo cane, which I varnished donkey’s years ago of about the same diameter. The rings on that one are spaced every eight inches so I converted that into the 1/6th scale measurement and marked the resin branch accordingly. Photo 12 shows the solder rings being applied in pairs on the pencilled marks and secured in place with drops of liquid super glue. After that it was time for the messy Milliput again, moulding the ‘moving’ joints of the cast hand into a proper wrist and applying the Milliput up to the solder rings to create the bamboo cane effect. After it was all completed and set hard I discovered that the wrist just didn’t look right. Despite the fact that the hand fitted into the arm just like the original action figure would have, and was exactly the same size, it looked too long and ‘gangly’ somehow. The solution was to carefully razor saw off a couple of mm off the end of the wrist and then saw off the locating peg to super glue back on the ‘stump’. The resultant pieces of the assembly are shown in Photo 13 just before I glued the peg back on. This was a little dicey as I inserted the peg into the arm, sanded the end flush and then offered up the hand with a drop of super glue on the wrist. It worked well but any seepage could have permanently glued the hand to the arm! Unfortunately I forgot to take a photo of the completed arm/hand/bamboo and as the torso is currently sitting in a deep bath of liquid silicone at the moment I can’t take one now, so Photo 14 illustrates the basic pose showing the original cast arm with the un-bamboo’d stick and the articulated wrist, (you can see the solder ring location marks for the bamboo rings though!)
In the next instalment, doing the same thing with the right arm!BigGrin

Until then, Happy Modelling to you All!

Robin.
Plymouth57 attached the following image(s):
Left arm and hand pic 3.JPG
First wooden ship: The Grimsby 12 Gun 'Frigate' by Constructo Second: Bounty DelPrado Part Works Third: HMS Victory DelPrado Part Works 1/100 scale
Diorama of the Battle of the Brandywine from the American Revolutionary War Diorama of the Battle of New Falkland (unfinished sci-fi), Great War Centenary Diorama of the Messines Ridge Assault
Index for the Victory diary is on page 1
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