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The Chindit Options
Plymouth57
#1 Posted : 03 January 2018 18:37:11

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Hello to All, and welcome to my Build of the Year competition entry for 2018! As you might have guessed from my last build “A Pair of Pups”, I have become a firm convert to scratch building in resin. For that project I ended up with loads of small silicon moulds – most were for single items, some of which required multiple moulds to create the pieces as they evolved through stages. I ended up going through about one and half kilos of silicon to cast around two hundred and fifty grams of resin (which still leaves me with the other two hundred and fifty grams in the bottles!)
For this year’s competition I’ve decided to take the resin learning experience to the next level – this entry will be composed entirely of home cast resin! My intention is to design, sculpt, mould and cast a 1/6th scale bust of a Chindit soldier from the Burma Campaign of WW2. For those not too sure on scales, this is Action Man size or GI Joe for you Yankees (well, half of one anyway).
The (vague) idea I have at the moment is to model the Chindit holding a machete in one hand whilst signalling a ‘hold position – I heard something ahead’ to the troops behind. This build will probably lead me on to another form of resin casting – the ‘slush’ or ‘roto’ method where the mould, unlike my first solid cast types will be coated with a special form of resin resulting in a hollow casting – partly to learn how to do it and partly to save on the amount of resin required – compared to the little 1/33 scale pieces I made for the Pups, this one’s huge! So far I’ve sent off to China for an articulated 1/6th scale body (so cheap it’s unbelievable) and a separate head (it doesn’t come with one) ALTHOUGH, I’ve since discovered a source of incredible resin heads from a British sculptor which, although dearer are far better suited to what I’m after, and a set of Dragon in Dreams (another producer of figures and uniforms in this scale) hands (just in case I can’t cast and alter the ones on the body).
At the moment I’m now looking for the cheapest examples of WW2 era ’37 Pattern Webbing – belts, straps and packs etc, to get the exact dimensions I need to reduce down to scale. Mostly it seems, on ebay, the days when you could pick these up for pennies in the Army Surplus stores in my youth are long gone (they’re collectors items now!)Blink
Anyhow, I can’t even begin to plan out this project until I’ve acquired more silicon, the new resins and the Chinese items have arrived so the photos below are just an indication of my thoughts.
Photo 1 illustrates the Chindit in his natural habitat – Jap infested jungle! You can just make out the 37 Pattern Webbing with the shoulder straps, front Ammo pouches, Water Bottle and Bayonet scabbard. My model will have all these, plus the .303 Ammo Bandolier also shown on the soldier. He will have his SMLE rifle, but slung over his shoulder as he is cutting his way through the jungle vegetation with his machete in the pose I have in mind. (This may change through the build however, the thought of reading his compass has come to mind but we’ll see). Photos 2 and 4 show the real men of the Chindits in action, 2 is taken during one of the deep penetration missions behind the Japanese lines and 4 is actually crossing the Chindwin River with their mules swimming alongside. Finally, Photo 3 shows the Chindit Badge, also used as a shoulder flash, it depicts the sacred Burmese Lion guarding a Pagoda shaped Temple in the background.
As I mentioned, it will be a while before I can start anything yet so in the meantime the next instalment will be a brief history of the Chindits themselves.

Until then, Happy Modelling to you All!

Robin.
Plymouth57 attached the following image(s):
The Chindits pic 1.JPG
First wooden ship: The Grimsby 12 Gun 'Frigate' by Constructo Second: Bounty DelPrado Part Works Third: HMS Victory DelPrado Part Works 1/100 scale
Diorama of the Battle of the Brandywine from the American Revolutionary War Diorama of the Battle of New Falkland (unfinished sci-fi), Great War Centenary Diorama of the Messines Ridge Assault
Index for the Victory diary is on page 1
Markwarren
#2 Posted : 03 January 2018 18:59:34

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If your last entry is anything to go by, this is going to be one to watch. Good luck Robin.

Mark
arpurchase
#3 Posted : 03 January 2018 19:43:00

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BigGrin Best of luck in the comp robinCool
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Tomick
#4 Posted : 03 January 2018 20:26:55
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Interesting unusual idea, good luck with your Build of the Year 2018 entry Cool
birdaj2
#5 Posted : 03 January 2018 20:31:50

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Robin

Well if there is anything "different" i would bet on you doing it BigGrin ( and that if unsure really is a compliment to your skills)

I know exactly what your talking about and can almost visualise what your aiming for.

Cannot wait to see what you pull off because i am thinking what are you going to put together for casting masters and the like.

This sounds very good and i have flagged this to keep in touch with your updates.

Best of luck with it .
Happy Modelling

Tony

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ModelMania
#6 Posted : 03 January 2018 21:13:13

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That sounds like another enthralling project from you Robin, I'm looking forward to your build already and wish you the very best of luck in the competition. ThumpUp

Kev Smile
Gandale
#7 Posted : 03 January 2018 22:37:08

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Hi Robin, you have hit on a subject that is very close to my heart. Take a look at the avatar under my username, something I'm proud of.... The avatar is in memory of my late father, he served with the Chindits during WWII in Burma. Suffice to say I look forward to seeing this all come together and am sure you'll do a great job..... Good luck with the build and the competition....Cool Cool

Regards

Alan
Spal
#8 Posted : 04 January 2018 00:45:28

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This sounds like another interesting build from you Robin, will look forward to seeing it come together.

Al
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jase
#9 Posted : 04 January 2018 09:00:02

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Intrested to see what you come up with for this

Jase
ian smith
#10 Posted : 07 January 2018 17:17:20

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Hi Robin.
Look forward to seeing what you do with this build.
Ian Cool BigGrin
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Plymouth57
#11 Posted : 10 January 2018 19:05:45

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Many thanks to Mark, Andy, Mr T, Tony, Kev, Alan, Al, Jase and Ian! Plans are still under way as I await more items from all over the place! The Chinese 'body' has arrived along with the head which I won't be using on this build plus the other head which I will!BigGrin
I thought you might like this one Alan, it was your avatar which partly gave me the idea for this project. At the moment I'm slowly building up a collection of the 37 Pattern webbing equipment as worn by all British forces during WW2, one item per week so it doesn't break the bank! Once I've got a full(ish) set I can then plan out the 1/6th scale versions to create the moulds and casts. Speaking of casts, I've been experimenting with the Roto Casting Resin which has arrived from DWR Plastics. Bought a small set first just to try it out and it seems to be going pretty well - a heck of a lot more work (or actually time) is required compared to the solid casting but so much cheaper to produce larger castings in the long run Cool.
Anyway, before I begin the Chindit History (Part 1)I have a question for Alan - what was your Dad's actual regiment when he was in the Chindits?

On with the history...

History of the Chindits Part 1:
Gideon Force and Wingate’s arrival in India.

The Chindits, officially known as the Long Range Penetration Group were the brainchild of Brigadier Orde Charles Wingate, (Photo 1) a maverick, unconventional British officer who first developed his theories of guerrilla warfare as the commander of “Gideon Force”, a mixed force of regular Sudanese and Abyssinian troops backed up by Abyssinian (Ethiopian) partisans who fought a war of disruption and intelligence gathering against the Italians in the Middle East under the overall command of General Archibald Wavell. (Photo 2) Gideon Force, part of which is shown in Photo 3 and undertaking their classic ambush tactics in Photo 5, was instrumental in defeating the Italians in Abyssinia and returning the Abyssinian Emperor Haile Selassie to his throne. The Emperor is pictured with his Royal Court in Photo 6. Wingate procured an Arab white stallion for the Emperor to ride in the triumphal parade through his capital Addis Ababa but the Emperor, grateful to Wingate for his assistance insisted on riding in a British army staff car with Wingate on the horse (an act which did not go down well with Wingate’s more orthodox brother officers and began the resistance to his methods from the ‘establishment’). Wingate’s triumphal entry into Addis Ababa is shown in Photo 4. What is generally unknown however is that Hitler, despite being Mussolini’s future ally and brother dictator, didn’t want to see him gaining an African colony when Germany had lost hers after the Great War, and he sent Emperor Selassie three aircraft, thirty anti-tank guns, sixteen thousand rifles and ten million rounds of ammo to help fight the Italians!Blink Photo 7 illustrates the close relationship that existed between the Emperor, seated in the centre and Wingate standing on the right, the Emperor trusted his entire army to Wingate (and the British), and Wingate made full use of the forces at his disposal to wage his guerrilla war.
In 1942, their job done, Gideon Force was disbanded and Wavell, who by now had been appointed Commander in Chief of the India Command requested Wingate’s presence to organise irregular forces to operate behind the Japanese lines. Wingate duly arrived in Burma in March 1942 and spent two months touring the Allied areas, adapting his theories to suit the Far Eastern conditions. He presented his plans to Wavell in a meeting in Delhi during which, the name “Chindit” was proposed by Captain Aung Thin DSO of the Burma Rifles. The name was a corrupted form of “Chinthe”, the mythical Burmese beast who guarded Buddhist temples.
The first Chindit unit was the 77th Indian Infantry Brigade, half of the Brigade were British, most from the 13th Battalion of the King’s Liverpool Regt together with men from the former “Bush Warfare School in Burma (renamed the 142 Commando Company). The rest were formed from the newly formed 3rd Battalion 2nd Gurkha Rifles, and the 2nd Battalion Burma Rifles who were survivors of several depleted Burmese Battalions, which had retreated into India. Wingate trained his command as Long Range Penetration units, which would advance on foot behind the Japanese forces and be supplied by air drops. Lacking any form of self contained artillery, the Chindits would be able to call in close air support when required. Their main tasks would be to rely on surprise through their mobility, attacking the Japanese supply and communication lines – a tactic the Japanese had themselves employed in 1942 against the British in Singapore and Burma. Wingate abandoned the traditional army formations and instead created eight self contained columns each with nine Bren guns and three 2” mortars, four Boys anti-tank rifles, two Vickers medium machine guns and two light anti-aircraft guns. The heavy weapons were carried on mules whilst the men carried their personal weapons (Lee Enfield SMLE’s and Sten guns) along with 72lbs of stores including ammunition, grenades, machetes or Kukris along with seven days rations and their groundsheets and a change of uniform. Proportionally, the men were carrying a heavier load than the mules. Each column also had a recon platoon from the Burma Rifles and a Sabotage Unit from the Commando Company. Additionally, the columns also had an RAF radio operator to call for air support and a Royal Corps of Signals team to maintain radio links with HQ. Royal Army Medical Corps were attached to each column’s headquarters section to treat the sick and wounded. Shortly before the commencement of the first operation codenamed “Longcloth” one of the eight columns was dispersed to bring the other seven up to full strength.

In part two, the first combat against the Japanese takes place as Operation Longcloth begins.

Robin.

Plymouth57 attached the following image(s):
Chindit History pic 1.JPG
First wooden ship: The Grimsby 12 Gun 'Frigate' by Constructo Second: Bounty DelPrado Part Works Third: HMS Victory DelPrado Part Works 1/100 scale
Diorama of the Battle of the Brandywine from the American Revolutionary War Diorama of the Battle of New Falkland (unfinished sci-fi), Great War Centenary Diorama of the Messines Ridge Assault
Index for the Victory diary is on page 1
Plymouth57
#12 Posted : 16 January 2018 17:29:25

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History of the Chindits Part 2:
“Operation Longcloth”


The original plan for “Longcloth” was that the Chindits would be deployed far behind the Japanese lines whilst the regular Allied forces commenced a large scale offensive into North Burma. Before the main attack could be finalised however, it was decided that the armies were not ready to participate in such a large campaign without further time to replace their losses incurred during the retreat through Burma and to train the new arrivals. Undeterred, Wingate proposed to Wavell that the Chindit operation be undertaken alone to test their new techniques against the Japanese and to prevent them from building up their forces for a new offensive of their own.
Wingate organised his force into two groups – the main force in the north consisting of Columns No. 3,4,5,7 and 8 with the Brigade HQ and a smaller force in the south made up of Columns 1 and 2 with the Group HQ, (Column 6 was the one broken up to replenish the others). This amounted to 2,000 men and 850 mules in the Northern Group and 1,000 men and 250 mules in the Southern Group. The theory was that the columns would move through the jungle itself, not along the usual roads and tracks, which transported troops would have to take. Security from Japanese counter attack would be provided by the enemy not knowing where the columns were heading or where they might strike next. The actual routes followed by the various columns is shown on the map in Photo 8. Air supply was to be provided by 31 Squadron of the RAF flying from Agartala in eastern Bengal. Despite having to supply around 3,000 men (and 1100 mules), the squadron never had more than three Lockheed Hudsons and three DC3 transports at any one time. Fighter escorts were provided when the situation permitted but when emergency drops at short notice were called in the transports had to fly alone, although, as the interior shot of the DC3 shows, the normally unarmed transports did in fact possess some teeth! It had been supposed that the men on the ground would have to create clearing for each supply drop but on one occasion an emergency drop had to be made into the jungle itself, this proved so successful that the technique was used many times again. No aircraft were lost during Longcloth.
On the 8th February, 1943 the Chindits left Imphal and entered into Japanese occupied Burma. There was no contact with the enemy for some time and then the advancing columns were sighted by Japanese patrols who believed the Chindits were simply small groups on intelligence gathering missions. The enemy only realised that their enemies were in Brigade strength after numerous outposts and patrols had been attacked and destroyed and railway bridges suddenly began blowing up! The Japanese were confused and surprised by the suddenly aggressive actions of an enemy they thought had been entirely driven out of Burma. The Japanese had no idea how the Chindits were being supplied and initially sent troops off to the west of Chindit sightings, hoping to cut off what they thought was a land supply route. Eventually of course, they finally realised what was going on when an air drop was interrupted by the coincidental arrival of a Japanese force searching for the Chindits on the 13th of March. Once the Chindit’s operational tactics were understood, the Japanese moved the western troops back from their pointless patrols and the Chindit columns began to find themselves surrounded. To retreat back to India would be very hazardous, with two major river crossings now guarded by the Japanese. Since going west was likely to be met with stiff resistance, the Chindits did the exact opposite and continued east, attacking whatever targets presented themselves. On the 24th March, Wingate was ordered to break off the operation and return. By now however the Chindits had advanced to the extreme range of the airdrops which, although successful were only providing the men with half of their required rations leading to malnutrition and subsequent exhaustion. They also found themselves in an area short of water supplies and heavily patrolled by increasing numbers of Japanese. In fact by now the Japanese had committed large numbers of men in an attempt to surround and capture the Chindits.
Wingate gave the order to return, dumping all non essential equipment and releasing the mules no longer needed to carry it. The Chindits were by now seriously short of food, many were sick and all now faced a dangerous journey to return back to India through the ever tightening Japanese forces. Many were ambushed on the march back, some were captured. One column moved north and marched into China to evade the enemy whilst another constructed a final jungle clearing airstrip to evacuate their sick and wounded. The rest returned by crossing back over the Chindwin and Irrawaddy rivers, either as a full column or else broken up into small groups better able to escape the Japanese net closing in. One column received an air drop of rubber dinghies to aid their escape whilst others who had by now lost their radio gear and couldn’t call for assistance were fortunately located by recon flights and re-supplied.
Of the three thousand officers and men who entered Burma, two thousand, one hundred and eighty two returned to the British lines having marched between one thousand and fifteen hundred miles through dense Japanese infested jungle. They were all sick and malnourished but in high spirits and rightfully proud of their epic achievement. Of those who returned, only six hundred were passed as fit for further front line service.
It was said by some top brass at the time (most of them Wingate’s detractors) and by many arm chair experts and historians ever since, that the effect of the Chindit’s raid was negligible, played little part in the overall Burma campaign and was a waste of men and materials. The only ‘experts’ whose opinion meant anything would be the Japanese High Command. They were later to admit after the war that the Chindits had come as a very nasty surprise to them. They had been extremely difficult to track down and as a result were forced to bring in thousands of troops, pulling them out of the rest camps where they had been sent to recover their strength before the next planned offensive. The main railway lines were put out of action for four weeks forcing the Japanese supplies to take longer routes, disrupting the flow to the front. To track down the Chindits, between six and eight entire Japanese battalions were diverted from other planned operations.
Perhaps the greatest effect of Operation Longcloth was the boosting of Allied morale. Until now the story of the war in Burma was one of defeat after defeat, of humiliating retreat after retreat. The British, Indian, Gurkha and Nigerian Chindits were the first allied unit to take the war back to the Japanese in their jungle terrain, fight them on far from equal terms and beat them at their own game. The myth of the invincible Japanese jungle fighter was smashed forever and the morale of the allied forces was raised no end. To the Japanese however, they suddenly realised their ever retreating western enemy wasn’t retreating any more! Much was learned from Longcloth, especially in the care of the sick and wounded, many of whom were left behind with friendly Burmese villagers or abandoned in the jungle. As a result, casualty evacuation became a high priority in future missions.
Churchill was very impressed with the results of Longcloth and Wingate’s grasp of guerrilla warfare. And, as you’ll see in the next instalment, so were the Americans!

Key to the rest of the Photos:

Photo 9 A Gurkha column crossing the Chindwin river at the start of the operation.
Photo 10 Chindits following one of the many smaller rivers.
Photo 11 Jungle rest camp. The man sitting on the mule is possibly suffering from malaria, it was the usual practise to place sick men on the mules until their fever passed when the next sick man would take their place. Almost out of shot on the left are a group of Japanese prisoners.
Photo 12 Nigerian soldiers of the West African Chindits.
Photo 13 Interior of the DC3 transport, note the improvised gun ports with Vickers ‘K’ guns (improved versions of the old Lewis Gun)
Photo 14 RAF Signals Unit attached to the columns calling for a supply drop.
Photo 15 The supply packs seen in the interior shot are heaved out the side door over what appears to be a clearing in the jungle.
Photo 16 and 17 Chindits laying explosives on one of the many railway bridges and the subsequent explosion.
Photo 18 and 19 Some of the survivors of Operation Longcloth. Their gaunt and emaciated condition as well as the sheer exhaustion is plain to see in these pictures.


Until next time.

Robin.
Plymouth57 attached the following image(s):
Chindit History pic 2.JPG
Chindit History pic 3.JPG
Chindit History pic 4.JPG
Chindit History pic 5.JPG
First wooden ship: The Grimsby 12 Gun 'Frigate' by Constructo Second: Bounty DelPrado Part Works Third: HMS Victory DelPrado Part Works 1/100 scale
Diorama of the Battle of the Brandywine from the American Revolutionary War Diorama of the Battle of New Falkland (unfinished sci-fi), Great War Centenary Diorama of the Messines Ridge Assault
Index for the Victory diary is on page 1
Gibbo
#13 Posted : 16 January 2018 20:52:17

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A great insight into a peice of history Robin.
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Plymouth57
#14 Posted : 04 February 2018 20:51:05

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Many thanks for that Paul! Apologies for the delay in continuing! Health matters haven’t been too good lately, not only have I had flare-ups with the IBS but an exploratory ultra sound scan of my innards looking for possible gall stones as a cause for the problem have revealed after a lifetime of avoiding fatty foods like the plague (I hate the taste of fat) I have fatty liver disease!Blink AND, just to rub it in, I spent part of last week down with Norovirus (the winter vomiting bug) and boy, is it well named!!Crying Anyway, I seem to be getting over it at last so here we go.
Most of the articles required for the build have now arrived so the real planning and experimenting can begin. The actual thing that gave me the idea for this model is shown in Photo 1. No, not Frederick himself, but his swanky new residence! This brilliant display case was found on ebay (of course), and was, to be honest, cheaper than I could make one for from scratch. The case consisting of five clip together acrylic panels measures 14cm square (at the base and lid) by 21.5cm high. It cost just under £9 which is very good value. I had intended using this size for the busts but it soon became apparent that this would be too tight. The next size up is intended to display a full size 1/6th scale figure and a bust, together with a name plinth (especially if the arm(s) are raised) isn’t going to be much shorter than the full figure height anyway. The next purchase will have to be one of those cases to make sure the pose will actually fit inside! That's just arrived now!
Photo 2 illustrates the basic ‘core’ of the bust – a 1/6th scale articulated ‘action figure’ all the way from China. The cost of this figure is even more impressive – far more articulation joints than a basic Action Man for just £3.25 (and free p&p!) Costing more than the whole figure, in Photo 3 I have a selection of hands, these are made by a company called “Dragon in Dreams”, who also make full figures and uniforms. The two I’m planning on using are the second one down (gripping the machete) and the bottom one (where the others are moulded that shape, this one actually bends to whatever position is required). Going back to the body again, in Photo 4 you can see the other reason apart from the cost that this figure is so useful – the whole thing is secured with lots of tiny screws! Although at that price I could simply epoxy the figure in the pose I want and saw it up to make moulds, I hate destroying any perfectly good model/item. So the intention is to dismantle the figure down to the torso and arms, make silicone moulds and resin casts to Milliput over and then put him back together again until the next figure evolves. In Photo 5 we have the head that won’t be used this time. This was another Chinese import at £2.29 and isn’t half bad at that price. I was going to Milliput a straggly beard and longer hair but after I’d sent off for that one I found a perfect match as seen in Photo 6. I came across an absolutely brilliant website called www.antheads.co.uk. This site is run by a chap called Tony Barton, who in my opinion is one of the best sculptors I’ve seen. I chose this head, No.67 in his catalogue as it looked just what I needed – haggard and exhausted. It was only after I’d ordered the head (and another item) that I looked through his photo gallery and discovered that he’d designed that face – for a Chindit figure!Blink (There must be something in that ‘Minds thinking alike’ saying!
So these are the main components, minus the plinth base which I’m still pondering over. The first job is to convert the solid resin Tony Barton casting into a hollow version which will eventually be losing the top of his head to accept his resin cast floppy jungle hat. So in the next instalment, lots of silicone rubber and my first experience of Roto Casting Resin.

Until then, Happy Modelling to you All!

Robin.
Plymouth57 attached the following image(s):
Chindit Parts pic 1.JPG
Chindit Parts pic 2.JPG
First wooden ship: The Grimsby 12 Gun 'Frigate' by Constructo Second: Bounty DelPrado Part Works Third: HMS Victory DelPrado Part Works 1/100 scale
Diorama of the Battle of the Brandywine from the American Revolutionary War Diorama of the Battle of New Falkland (unfinished sci-fi), Great War Centenary Diorama of the Messines Ridge Assault
Index for the Victory diary is on page 1
ModelMania
#15 Posted : 05 February 2018 13:07:13

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Looks like a nice collection of body parts for you to build on Robin. Can't wait to watch this build evolve and I'm sure it will be completely enthralling as your projects always are! Cool Drool ThumpUp

Can't believe how much that head in photo #5 reminds me of Arnold Schwarzenegger! Glare Blink BigGrin

Kev Smile
Spal
#16 Posted : 05 February 2018 13:22:20

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Not only Schwarzenegger in pic #5 but pic #6 could be Kirk Douglas in his younger days LOL nice update Robin, look forward to seeing more of your progress.

Al
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#17 Posted : 05 February 2018 14:37:41

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Great to see this one get under way, look forward to your next update.....Cool Cool

Regards

Alan
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#18 Posted : 11 February 2018 20:20:51

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Many thanks to Kev, Al and Alan! The more I look at the pics the more of those resemblances I can see! I hadn't noticed it until you mentioned it!Blushing
Since the whole idea behind this year’s entry is to create an entire model made of home cast resin, the first task I had to attempt was to turn the solid resin Tony Barton head into a hollow replica which will be fitted onto the also hollow torso later. Photo 1 illustrates the solid original fitted onto a plasticene ‘plug’ under the neck, resting in the lego brick mould casting box. The plan was that the plug was supposed to stick the head to the side wall and the first pouring of silicone rubber would flow under the head. What actually happened was that the head slowly sank down during the curing and came to rest on the plasticene base. When the rubber has cured I found a tiny hole where the back of the head touched the base which needed a second layer of silicone poured over the underside of the rubber. In hindsight, what I should have done was to pour in a layer of silicone first, let that cure and then put in the head to rest on that before pouring the main silicone in! Photo 2 shows the first pouring after curing before trimming off the rubber ‘flash’. The silicone was poured in up to the half way point in the width of the head as you can see. In Photo 3, the flash has been trimmed off and the edges of the rubber cut away to create the locating tabs for the second half of the mould. Once these were cut the surface of the rubber was given three coats of liquid wax release agent. When the last coat was dry the lego box was built up to the final height ready to pour in the second half of the mould as shown in Photo 4. Once the second half has fully cured, the two parts were carefully separated and the head removed. After placing the mould halves back together a small quantity of the Roto Resin was mixed together (1:1 part A and B just as per the ‘normal’ polyurethane resin) and the mixture was poured into the mould. I then had to carefully rotate the mould around, ensuring the liquid resin ran into all the various depressions inside the mould plus ‘almost’ running out of the top to cover the front of the neck and the plug. Eventually, when the resin can’t be seen to be running around anymore the mould was left either upside down or tilted up face down so any resin still able to ‘drool’ around would collect either in the top of the head or behind the face for extra thickness. The liquid resin can be seen running around the inside of the mould in Photo 5. This was repeated three more times giving an overall thickness of four coats of resin resulting in the finished casting shown in Photos 6 and 7. The detail from the silicone mould has come out very well indeed, the plug part will be cut away later when the torso is modelled and the head will then become an integral part of an even bigger mould with the head and torso combined as one casting.
In the next instalment, before starting the body part I’ll be creating the iconic floppy jungle hat to complete the head section first.

Until then, Happy Modelling to you All!

Robin.
Plymouth57 attached the following image(s):
Creating the hollow head pic 1.JPG
Creating the hollow head pic 2.JPG
First wooden ship: The Grimsby 12 Gun 'Frigate' by Constructo Second: Bounty DelPrado Part Works Third: HMS Victory DelPrado Part Works 1/100 scale
Diorama of the Battle of the Brandywine from the American Revolutionary War Diorama of the Battle of New Falkland (unfinished sci-fi), Great War Centenary Diorama of the Messines Ridge Assault
Index for the Victory diary is on page 1
ModelMania
#19 Posted : 11 February 2018 20:48:33

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Excellent work on the home casting Robin, looks a flawless replica of the original resin head! CoolThumpUp

Another way to have kept the head raised and to prevent it from dropping down when pouring the silicone into the mould would have been to drill a suitably sized hole into the underside of the neck, insert a piece of brass rod, and then drill a hole the same size into the side of your Lego box and then disassemble the Lego bricks until you can insert the rod between them and tightly reassemble them to leave the head firmly suspended mid-air?

Keep up the good work Robin. ThumpUp

Kev Smile
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#20 Posted : 11 February 2018 21:15:13

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Great work RobinDrool regards PhilCool
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