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The Chindit Options
ian smith
#41 Posted : 18 March 2018 21:29:57

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Cool Fantastic work robinDrool
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Plymouth57
#42 Posted : 30 March 2018 17:57:28

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Many thanks there Ian, the health ups and downs have been slowing me up lately but finally, here's the next part!
I’ve made countless model soldiers throughout the years from 1/72 scale through 1/35 to 1/24 scale. I’ve glued them together and painted them up but until now I’ve never really understood how the belts and straps moulded on them were actually fitted together. Now that I’m creating a scratch built figure in 1/6th scale I’m going to have to find out what all those bits and pieces actually do in order to re-create them in miniature. Photo 1 shows the excellent reference book I found on the web to help build my 1/6th scale webbing. This is British Web Equipment of the two World Wars by Martin J Brayley (like it says on the cover!Blushing ) I say excellent because if you want really detailed photos of every piece of British Military Web Equipment with details and descriptions, this is the one to get. Unfortunately, as with many great reference books on military things, when it comes to trying to make miniature representations there’s one thing missing – the actual ruddy dimensions of the stuff! So, over the last few months, piece by piece, I’ve been acquiring the real thing off ebay. All this stuff used to be as common as muck in all the old army surplus stores and could be picked up really cheaply. Not any more though, the Second World War is now a ‘Collector’s Era’ and the price has gone through the roof! Look long enough though and you can still pick up some good bargains at a reasonable price. So far I’ve got hold of a pair of braces, the main supporting belt, a great condition water bottle and straps, a bayonet frog and three basic ammo pouches (these were all RAF blue ones as they’re much cheaper!) All of these items can now be used to obtain the full measurements required to create the 1/6th versions required for the figure. Essentially, the webbing set is a harness, consisting of a waist belt to which are attached a pair of braces. Unlike normal braces however, they are only attached to the rear of the belt, they are not attached to the front, instead being attached to the rear of either small cartridge carriers (similar to the 1908 Pattern carriers used in the Great War) or either to the larger ‘Basic Ammunition Pouch’ so iconic of the WW2 Tommy, more on them later. It is the cartridge carriers or the basic pouch, which are actually attached to the belt at the front.
To begin the set I’ll be starting off with the pair of braces which carry the weight of the full set of equipment on poor Tommy’s shoulders.
Photo 2 illustrates one of those braces, I’ve had to photograph it ‘folded up’ unfortunately as it’s just too darned long to get it out straight and still be close enough to see the details! For those interested in the dimensions, they are as follows: the lengths in brackets are the 1/6th scale measurements:
Length of wide shoulder pad: 12” / 305mm (48.8mm)
Width of shoulder pad: 2 and 1/10” / 54mm (8.6mm)
Length of straps: 20” / 508mm (81.2mm)
Width of straps: 1” / 26mm (4.1mm)
Photo 3 shows the stitched on strap attached to both ends of the shoulder pad, in this example the ends of the pad are folded in and stitched down to produce the triangular end shape, other manufacturers used slightly different methods during the war. If you look again at Photo 2 you can see a ‘loop’ stitched onto the top strap, this is shown in close up in Photo 4. This is where the two braces cross over the back and, should only be found on one of the two braces. In actual fact my set has both braces with a loop so I’ve actually got two of the same side – still, it’s far better having two with loops than two without!BigGrin Photo 5 is a close up of the two ends of the straps illustrating the brass strap ends. These are of high quality brass secured by rivets as shown here. The idea was that the brass should be allowed to tarnish, the verdigris oxidation layer turning it a camouflaged green. However, right up to the declaration of war, the Sgt. Majors insisted on having many hours spent polishing up the brass until it was gleaming (and a dead give-a-way under fire!) Photo 6 is a close up of the under side of the shoulder pad – strap joint. In all these photos, the one thing that stands out is the heavy weave appearance of the webbing. In order to reproduce this in 1/6th scale, how to get that effect in miniature would be the first thing to sort out.
After trying out various means of obtaining that woven effect I finally had a brainwave. Measuring the full sized weave I found that there were eleven stitches to the inch. Reducing this to 1/6th would give me sixty six stitches to the inch. As I was ordering a sheet of stainless steel mesh to repair our broken veg steamer I realised that the same small sheet of mesh was available in sixty mesh size (60 grids to the inch). That was close enough, in full size that was only one stitch short, Photo 7 shows that small sheet with the thin strip I subsequently cut off it to make it easier to handle. Photo 8 is a close up showing the individual strips in the mesh and Photo 9 is the first trial run to create the scaled down webbing. The webbing is made from 9mm wide DecraLed lead strip, folded to double thickness. The steel mesh strip was placed over the top of the lead and rolled down using an aluminium knife handle to imprint the mesh into the soft metal. This trial piece also has stitches down the sides using a pounce wheel. The shoulder pads are shown under way in Photo 10, the pads are 48mm in length and 8.6mm in width. The lower example has had it’s corners folded in as per the original and the centre of the folds are covered up by the addition of the straps, the first one having been super glued in place in Photo 11 (with sewing needle ‘stitches’ added afterwards). The knife handle ‘rolling pin’ worked ok, but I thought there must be a more efficient tool to do this with. I tried a plastic wallpaper edging roller but found the drum wasn’t hard enough to get a good impression with, but then, looking on ebay for rollers I found a solid aluminium alternative. This brilliant tool is shown in Photo 12 but be aware – whilst this one can be found for about £8 or so, there is another which looks very similar for a couple of pound less but has a much thinner arm attaching the roller to the handle – fine for wallpaper but I think a little too thin for the pressures needed here. Finally in Photo 13 we have the finished braces. One of the straps has stitching on the end but ignore that, the ends will be cut off when the braces are fitted to the figure and new ends will be made with the brass tips, which will be attached to the water bottle.
In the next instalment, working out the waist belt (which is a lot bigger and far more complicated!)Blink

Until then, Happy Modelling to you All!

Robin.
Plymouth57 attached the following image(s):
Pattern 37 Webbing pic 1.JPG
Pattern 37 Webbing pic 2.JPG
Pattern 37 Webbing pic 3.JPG
First wooden ship: The Grimsby 12 Gun 'Frigate' by Constructo Second: Bounty DelPrado Part Works Third: HMS Victory DelPrado Part Works 1/100 scale
Diorama of the Battle of the Brandywine from the American Revolutionary War Diorama of the Battle of New Falkland (unfinished sci-fi), Great War Centenary Diorama of the Messines Ridge Assault
Index for the Victory diary is on page 1
Gibbo
#43 Posted : 31 March 2018 02:29:23

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Lovely detail as always Robin, glad you're feeling a bit better mate.
Regards
Paul
Building: DelPrado HMS Victory. DeAgostini HMS VictoryCollecting: DeAgostini Sovereign Of The Seas.
Markwarren
#44 Posted : 31 March 2018 09:40:24

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Lovely work Robin, glad to hear you are feeling better.

Mark
tigerace
#45 Posted : 31 March 2018 10:09:05

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Great work Robin BigGrin regards PhilCool
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CaptnBirdseye
#46 Posted : 31 March 2018 10:38:40

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Excellent build Robin Drool The level of detail is only matched by the level of historical information supplied. Both top notch.
Regards Gray
ian smith
#47 Posted : 31 March 2018 13:41:10

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Great work on the webbing robin.Cool BigGrin
Current builds.Hachettes build the bismark,HMS Victory, HMS Hood.
Finished Builds Corel HMS Victory cross section.
ModelMania
#48 Posted : 31 March 2018 17:53:12

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Another excellent lesson on scratchbuilding techniques, with some very innovative ideas - well done!

Glad you are feeling better now Robin. Cool ThumpUp

Kev Smile
Plymouth57
#49 Posted : 02 April 2018 15:42:35

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Many thanks to Paul, Mark, Phil, Gray, Ian and Kev for those kind words! The bugs and viruses of this winter seem to be particularly difficult to shake off (or maybe I'm just getting older!Crying )
A slight change to the upcoming installments - there was a link on the antsheads site (the producer of the Chindit's head) to a very friendly chap called Richard Elbourne who produced etched brass frets of the buckles for the 1937 Webbing. He still does, and in fact has just had another batch made up, so I'm just waiting for them to arrive now before continuing with the belt. In the meantime, it's a 'here's one I made earlier' to come next with the scratch built P'07 Bayonet.
I've also managed to find a set of plastic letters and numerals to make up the base nameplate with - and Kev will appreciate this one - I found them online at a model shop called ModelMania Bristol!!LOL

See you all soon!

Robin
First wooden ship: The Grimsby 12 Gun 'Frigate' by Constructo Second: Bounty DelPrado Part Works Third: HMS Victory DelPrado Part Works 1/100 scale
Diorama of the Battle of the Brandywine from the American Revolutionary War Diorama of the Battle of New Falkland (unfinished sci-fi), Great War Centenary Diorama of the Messines Ridge Assault
Index for the Victory diary is on page 1
Plymouth57
#50 Posted : 08 April 2018 16:53:46

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As mentioned in the last posting, a slight change to the diary schedule. In this installment I’ll be starting the SMLE bayonet, which will be slung from the Chindit’s waist belt. Although for this model the bayonet is sheathed in its scabbard, I decided to go the whole way and model both the bayonet and a separate scabbard, that way, if and when I make any further busts equipped with the SMLE (like WW1 era for example) I’ll already have that little item made up!
Photo 1 illustrates the real thing – this is a one hundred and one year old Pattern 1907 Bayonet. This one was made by one of the lesser known manufacturers J. Chapman Ltd. The Pattern 1907, usually abbreviated to P’07 was made by companies in the UK, USA, India and Australia. Most of the WW1 examples were made by Sanderson (1,600,00) and Wilkinson (2,360,000 and yes, that’s the Wilkinson Blade company!)
Against those numbers, Chapman made 300,000. This particular one was manufactured in January 1917 although for some reason (possibly using up some older materials) the scabbard is earlier as it is equipped with the tear-drop retaining stud which was changed to a simpler round stud to speed up production during the war. The webbing ‘Frog’ which attaches the scabbard to the webbing belt is actually post war and dated 1951 but is identical to the later WW1 and throughout WW2 examples. I would have shown the scabbard without the frog but once it was fitted on its damned near impossible to get it off again!Blink The webbing frog replaced the earlier leather version after the start of the Great War – again to speed up production. The black leather scabbard is equipped with steel ends – the Chape at the tip and the Locket up the top end. The bayonet is composed of twelve pieces – the tempered steel blade, the cross piece, the brazed on pommel with its spring loaded bolt and nut which secures the bayonet in place and finally the two wooden grips with their steel nuts and bolts (although the bolts are actually called screws in the manual!) The official designation of the P’07 is a Sword Bayonet as it is long enough to be used as a short sword in combat. Photos 2 to 6 show the bayonet in close up. Photo 2 shows the rear of the screws and nuts securing the wooden grips with the sprung bolt sticking up out of the pommel. The ring on the cross piece fits over the corresponding round lug on the front of the rifle’s muzzle. Photo 3 is from the other side and shows the other end of the sprung bolt sitting flush against the pommel – notice as well the deep groove running down the blade, this is the Fuller although many call it the Blood Groove. It doesn’t really have anything to do with blood however, it simply lightens the weight of the blade without reducing its strength. Photo 4 illustrates the end of the pommel with that bolt again and the groove which locates onto the bayonet lug at the rear of the muzzle cap. When the bayonet is fitted on the rifle, part of that flush side of the bolt protrudes out slightly as it moves over the locating lug and then drops back flush again. Photo 5 shows the tight fitting webbing frog fitted over the Locket and its stud whilst Photo 6 shows the rear of the Chape, again notice the raised strip up the centre – this fits over the stitched leather scabbard fold, the fold carries all the way up to the steel Locket at the top.
So, the first job was to decide how to make that deep Fuller groove along the blade of my 1/6th scale P’07. I had already decided that the majority of the miniature bayonet would be made from sheet plasticard so the first couple of attempts involved trying to file, sand or router the groove into a section of plasticard the correct thickness for the blade. Needless to say, those methods weren’t particularly successful. Without such a thing as a mini-router table or attachment, attempting to use the rotary tool as a handheld resulted in the diamond dust ball point going everywhere (except in the straight line I wanted) whilst the diamond dust rat tail files were a little straighter but not consistent enough. In the end, the solution was fairly obvious – I chose to construct the blade as a lamination instead of a single piece. Photo 7 shows the three sections of the blade – a thicker central section with two thinner outer parts. These were marked with a pencil dot where the fuller began and ended which were then drilled through with a drill bit the same diameter as the width of the fuller (middle piece in the photo). Then, carefully using the very sharp pointed knife I used with the paper Pups last year, I slowly scribed along the plastic blade joining the top of one hole to the other followed by the bottom, eventually removing the plastic from between them (bottom example). Photo 8 shows the same pieces with the first outer skin glued in place and the waste strip below. In Photo 9 both the outer laminations have been glued down and left to harden off overnight (I’m using standard Liquid Poly type glue here). The following day the full thickness blade was sanded down to create the pointed tip and the sharpened ‘cutting edge’. You can see the tiny size of the miniature version up against the original here! The next task was to shape the tang of the blade which followed the wooden grip profile and to shape another section of plasticard to create the cross piece as shown in Photo 10. Note the small hole on the cross piece, I’ve left this small although it should be much bigger to form a ring which fits over the muzzle cap lug. I’ll have to create a silicone mould for this later and I can’t see any way to have that ring without the liquid rubber flowing through it and locking the original prototype in the mould! It’ll have to be cast with a small hole which is simply a marker to drill out the larger one afterwards.
In the second part of the Bayonet instalment, finishing the wooden grips (with wood), adding the pommel and then starting the scabbard and frog (Oh Joy!)BigGrin Note to self: on the next one, try to remember to add the cross piece BEFORE gluing on the pommel!Blushing

Until then, Happy Modelling to you All!

Robin.
Plymouth57 attached the following image(s):
Pattern 1907 Bayonet pic 1.JPG
Pattern 1907 Bayonet pic 2.JPG
Pattern 1907 Bayonet pic 3.JPG
First wooden ship: The Grimsby 12 Gun 'Frigate' by Constructo Second: Bounty DelPrado Part Works Third: HMS Victory DelPrado Part Works 1/100 scale
Diorama of the Battle of the Brandywine from the American Revolutionary War Diorama of the Battle of New Falkland (unfinished sci-fi), Great War Centenary Diorama of the Messines Ridge Assault
Index for the Victory diary is on page 1
ian smith
#51 Posted : 08 April 2018 22:59:27

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Hi Robin.
great update. IanBigGrin
Current builds.Hachettes build the bismark,HMS Victory, HMS Hood.
Finished Builds Corel HMS Victory cross section.
Markwarren
#52 Posted : 09 April 2018 11:00:25

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great work Robin, looking excellent.BigGrin

Mark
Plymouth57
#53 Posted : 15 April 2018 20:29:30

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Thanks again to Ian and Mark. This is a 'shortie' as it ends with a question which will be answered in the next post!Blink

Carrying on from the start of the bayonet, Photo 11 shows that cross piece fitted onto the main blade/tang. In order to create the wooden hand grips I decided to use actual wood. I could have done this in plasticard instead of course, but I chose the wood for two reasons – firstly after sanding to shape the grips would have just the right texture (ie, wood!) And secondly, it is extremely hard to judge how much sanding you’ve done onto a tiny piece of white plasticard! Grey might have been easier but all my sheets are plain white now, I’ve long since exhausted the beautiful grey sheets of Plastruct I once had. That material was slightly denser and stiffer than plasticard – lovely stuff to work with though! The first side has been sanded to shape in Photo 12 with the second piece standing by. The wood, by the way is from the Costa Coffee stirrers again (I’ve got a forest’s worth of them by now!) The second grip is shaped and sanded down in Photo 13, ready to be super glued in position as seen in Photo 14. In this shot the Pommel is also under way. I first cut off a thin slice from the top of the hilt tang starting just beyond the end of the wood grips and then glued two rectangular slabs either side of the tang. These will then be carved and sanded into the curved profile of the Pommel as shown in Photo 15 and the sliced off sliver of the tang provides the slot which slides over the bayonet stud on the Enfield nose cap. A slice of plastic rod was cut and glued onto the left side of the Pommel to simulate the sprung bolt and two shallow holes were drilled into the Pommel between that bolt and the grips. This feature was not found on the earlier P’07’s but was added after the advent of trench warfare and the attendant ever-present mud! It was found that with the bayonet hanging from the left side of the webbing belt, it would be rubbed against the sides of the trench as the Tommies moved about (or dived for cover), resulting in the slot becoming clogged up with dirt. Eventually the slot became so full of mud that the bayonet couldn’t be clipped onto the rifle. The holes, which go right through the Pommel allow the mud to be pushed up the slot and then poked out via the holes. The two ‘wet’ spots on the grips are drops of Deluxe Card Glue (PVA) which were applied to form the grip screws. Now this was supposed to be the conclusion of the bayonet construction but when I added this picture to the diary I discovered a mistake so elementary and silly I’m almost ashamed to admit I made it. Fortunately I was able to rectify it and at the same time do some improvements to the hilt. The howler will be pointed out in the next instalment when I begin the bayonet scabbard but in the meantime, see if you can find it – its so ruddy obvious I still can’t believe I did it!Blushing
Until then, Happy Modelling to you All!

Robin.
Plymouth57 attached the following image(s):
Pattern 1907 Bayonet pic 4.JPG
First wooden ship: The Grimsby 12 Gun 'Frigate' by Constructo Second: Bounty DelPrado Part Works Third: HMS Victory DelPrado Part Works 1/100 scale
Diorama of the Battle of the Brandywine from the American Revolutionary War Diorama of the Battle of New Falkland (unfinished sci-fi), Great War Centenary Diorama of the Messines Ridge Assault
Index for the Victory diary is on page 1
Martyn Ingram
#54 Posted : 15 April 2018 20:47:42

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Confused Now let me see could it be the hilt is the wrong way round BigGrin
Stunning work as always Robin
Martyn
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Plymouth57
#55 Posted : 15 April 2018 20:58:32

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Ah Poop! You've got better eyes than I did!BigGrin Yes, I put the ruddy cross piece on upside down which means it couldn't fit on the rifle at all!Blushing

Well spotted Martyn!

Robin.
First wooden ship: The Grimsby 12 Gun 'Frigate' by Constructo Second: Bounty DelPrado Part Works Third: HMS Victory DelPrado Part Works 1/100 scale
Diorama of the Battle of the Brandywine from the American Revolutionary War Diorama of the Battle of New Falkland (unfinished sci-fi), Great War Centenary Diorama of the Messines Ridge Assault
Index for the Victory diary is on page 1
Markwarren
#56 Posted : 16 April 2018 07:45:09

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Lovely work Robin.

Mark
Plymouth57
#57 Posted : 22 April 2018 15:45:45

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Thanks again there to Mark! Blushing
Ok then, following on from the ‘um, ‘oversight’ in the last installment,Crying Photo 17 illustrates the finished prototype P’07 Bayonet. I was able to cut off the triangular section of the cross piece and re-glue it to the underside where the ring part was similarly removed. It was very slightly wider than the ring was at that point so I was able to sand it back into shape once the glue had hardened off. Unfortunately this also meant that the ring was slightly undersized when attempting to fit it back on the top so a completely new one had to be made out of the plasticard sheet. This time instead of a small hole in the centre I just drilled a small depression to mark the place to drill out the hollow ring. With the bayonet complete I could now move on to the scabbard. This was found to be thicker than the plasticard used for the bayonet but not quite twice the thickness so the rectangular former shown in Photo 18 is a lamination using the bayonet sheet with another thinner one to make up the difference. The glued former is shown sanded to shape in Photo 19 along with two sections of plasticard – the shaped (and thinner) one on the right is to form the curved Locket section which is raised above the leather scabbard whilst the slightly thicker rectangle will be used to make the raised rim at the mouth of the scabbard. The Locket was first glued to the flat end of the scabbard with liquid poly and allowed to set completely. Once dry, one of the overlapping sides was brushed with the same glue on the underside and allowed a few minutes for the thin plastic to soften up. Once it was a little bit pliable I brushed the liquid poly on again and carefully bent the overlap around the side of the scabbard and across the rear, securing it in place with spring tweezers until the glue had set as shown in Photo 20. Once the glue was dry I then gently sliced down the centre line and pulled away the excess plasticard, finishing off by filing and sanding smooth the rough area where the glue had been. When that was complete I could then repeat the process with the other overlap, marking the join before the glue had set, slicing off the excess and then keeping the softened strip in place with the tweezers as before. Photo 21 shows that raised rim or lip at the mouth of the Locket, (as I said before, without the frog would have been clearer but a real job getting the ruddy thing out of it!) This is where that slightly thicker piece of plasticard comes in, Photo 22 shows a section of it glued to the end of the scabbard – this is the rear of the Locket, which shows how nicely those softened overlaps came together – the bottom edge should in reality be curved like the front, but that would have meant a lot more work to achieve and its going to be covered up anyway! Photo 23 shows the front of the Locket with the proper curve and also that rim sanded back so it’s just standing proud of the Locket. Now it was time to create the bottom end or Chape of the scabbard. This was very similar to the Locket with two sections of the thin plasticard as shown in Photo 24. This time however I had to create the curves back and front so the technique was a little different. Instead of joining the two parts together at the centre line, I had to glue the first shaped piece on, let it dry completely (Photo 25) before softening the plastic with liquid poly as before. This time though the spring tweezers gripped the plastic in place on the sides, not the front and back and once set a safety razor blade was used to cut down the side centre line to remove the excess sheet. After repeating this with the other half-Chape and allowing a full night to set I could then carefully sand the Chape to the correct profile as shown in Photo 25. Note that darker grey piece – that’s a tiny length of stretched sprue to represent the steel staple securing the Chape to the leather. The rear side of the Chape is a little more complicated as seen in Photo 26. The leather scabbard is stitched together down the rear centre line resulting in a pronounced raised rib along the length. The steel Chape is shaped to ride over this rib, which needed a wedged shaped plasticard addition as shown in this double pic. This is also secured with a stretched sprue staple, this time a curved one sitting across the raised section. The rib running down the scabbard was made from a length of plastic rod. I cut a section overlong, and holding one end down, scraped the knife blade along it, ‘shaving’ off tiny amounts of the plastic until I had a flat edge. Then the scraped rod was cut to length and glued to the scabbard. The top end doesn’t go under the Locket, it’s just chamfered off over the last inch or so. The webbing Frog straps were made from the DecraLed strip as shown in Photos 28 and 29 with the steel stud in between them simply a cut down brass nail from Victory’s supplies. Note the hole drilled between the straps on the rear shown in Photo 29, this marries up with the stud fitted onto the webbing strap shown in Photo 30 which suspends the frog from the Chindit’s belt, (there will also be another stud on the rear of the strap later to attach the frog strap to that belt.)
Finally in Photo 31 I have the trial mould for the bayonet and scabbard under way. Although it worked fairly well I had some problems with air bubbles and eventually went for smaller individual moulds instead which finally yielded up the set of resin casts as illustrated in Photo 32 (one good bayonet – nine ‘almosts’!)Blink And I almost completely forgot to mention that the PVA 'screws' in the wooden hilt were also replaced with stretched sprue, stretched into a thin rod and then offered up to the flame to produce the little domed 'mushroom'for the screw head - much better than before!
In the next installment, beginning the Pattern ’37 Belt (with a little help!)BigGrin

Until then, Happy Modelling to you All!

Robin.
Plymouth57 attached the following image(s):
Pattern 1907 Bayonet pic 5.JPG
Pattern 1907 Bayonet pic 6.JPG
Pattern 1907 Bayonet pic 7.JPG
Pattern 1907 Bayonet pic 8.JPG
First wooden ship: The Grimsby 12 Gun 'Frigate' by Constructo Second: Bounty DelPrado Part Works Third: HMS Victory DelPrado Part Works 1/100 scale
Diorama of the Battle of the Brandywine from the American Revolutionary War Diorama of the Battle of New Falkland (unfinished sci-fi), Great War Centenary Diorama of the Messines Ridge Assault
Index for the Victory diary is on page 1
ian smith
#58 Posted : 01 May 2018 16:56:48

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Looking Fantastic robin. really enjoying seeing this on come together.
Ian BigGrin Cool
Current builds.Hachettes build the bismark,HMS Victory, HMS Hood.
Finished Builds Corel HMS Victory cross section.
Sticky Wickett
#59 Posted : 02 May 2018 11:27:42

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Looks fab Robin. Lots of research coupled with plenty of detailing will make this a great show piece.

Regards,
Phil W.
Completed projects: 1/43 scale Bedford HA van / 1/43 scale MG TD sports car
Current projects: 1/48 scale U-boat [U230]
Future projects: 1/148 scale railway diorama / 1/50 scale R/C Volvo F89 logging truck / 1/148 scale Thunderbirds Fireflash
ModelMania
#60 Posted : 02 May 2018 12:40:41

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Excellent work as always Robin. ThumpUp

Great attention to detail and I love the way that you're always willing to have a go at making most of the parts yourself from next to nothing - top work, keep it up! Cool

Kev Smile
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