Welcome Guest Search | Active Topics | Log In | Register

8 Pages «<23456>»
The Chindit Options
Gibbo
#61 Posted : 02 May 2018 14:10:45

Rank: Vice-Master

Build-Diary Medal: Build-Diary Medal of HonourActive Service Medal: 500 post active service Medal
Groups: Registered

Joined: 26/05/2014
Posts: 754
Points: 2,307
Location: East Sussex UK
Some great stuff going on as always Robin.
Regards
Paul
Building: DelPrado HMS Victory. DeAgostini HMS VictoryCollecting: DeAgostini Sovereign Of The Seas.
Tomick
#62 Posted : 02 May 2018 15:21:20

Rank: Pro

Groups:

Joined: 24/08/2009
Posts: 43,208
Points: -6,318
Nice how the items are turning out Cool

Just wondering why create moulds of scratch built items, are you planning to later sell Chindit as a kit, hence creating duplication moulds from the scratch build originals?
Plymouth57
#63 Posted : 06 May 2018 20:16:50

Rank: Elite

Build-Diary Medal: Build-Diary Medal of HonourActive Service Medal: 500 post active service MedalPurple Medal: Super active service medal for 1000 postsRed Medal: Red MedalTurquoise Medal: Turquoise Medal for model making know-how contributionOutstanding Build: An award for an outstanding build
Groups: Registered

Joined: 03/10/2012
Posts: 1,759
Points: 5,287
Location: Plympton
Grateful thanks as always to Ian, Phil, Kev, Paul and Mr T!Blushing for those kind words.
The primary reason for all the mould making is to follow my original target for this year's entry - creating the entire model in home cast resin. Although creating a simple prototype or one-off such as the bayonet would be far easier (not to mention quicker)Blink the added benefit of this method is that if and when I build further busts I can use the resin copies for them too (this particular bayonet is essentially both WW1 and WW2, so lots of possibilities there!Cool )
As for the likelihood of producing a kit to sell, have to admit it's a nice idea, it all depends on how the finished article turns out, how much work and effort is involved in the casting (more than I'd anticipated so far) and of course whether anyone was interested! Still, we'll see!BigGrin
So on with the belt...

Photo 9 shows the result of the little brass buckle mould. This is a dinky little thing about the size of a box of matches! It was produced by just sticking the brass buckle down onto soft plasticene, and then trimming the plasticene base to the size of the Lego bricks to form the moulding box. The object being to get most of the impression in the silicone mould shown here. There is a second half to the mould of course but with only a very faint impression. To cast the buckle a small amount of mixed resin was poured onto the mould and a cocktail stick used to force the resin into the nooks and crannies of the impression. Another drop of resin was added to the other half of the mould and the two parts were then quickly pressed together and allowed to set. The first casting is shown in Photo 10 alongside the brass original (before some more cleaning up, ie, sanding down!) The DecraLed webbing belt material is shown in Photo 11. This is a double thickness of the lead strip, once again embossed with the stainless steel mesh but with the addition of an inscribed ‘channel’ along each edge to form the pronounced ridge found along the edges on the real thing. Measuring the length of the ‘tucked in’ section of the belt on my full sized original I reduced that length down to 1/6th scale and carefully threaded the lead strip through the resin buckle, folding it down behind as illustrated in Photo 12. The last task for this half of the belt was to cut a section of that brass fret which, as mentioned last time is specifically designed to make up the brass sliding grips as seen in Photo 13. This was simply a case of cutting a piece long enough to cover the front of the belt, with enough left to be bent around the rear as shown here. When the torso and shirt is finished, the half of the belt with the buckle can be glued to the front of the waist and the belt brought around the torso to meet up with the buckle again. Those looking closely might be thinking ‘how is he going to thread the belt through the other side of the buckle and trim it off?’Blink The answer is – I can’t! Despite the careful sanding and filing to get that hollow buckle I’ll be measuring where the belt would have passed through the slot, bending the lead strip back on itself and then carefully cutting off the buckle strip to slot the belt in place, giving the impression that it is actually passing through it! Sneaky but hopefully effective!
In the next instalment, putting on the first layer of Milliput on the torso, which, at the moment is having a little re-thinking and re-planning as to what goes where!

Until then, Happy Modelling to you All!


Robin.
Plymouth57 attached the following image(s):
Pattern 37 Webbing pic 6.JPG
First wooden ship: The Grimsby 12 Gun 'Frigate' by Constructo Second: Bounty DelPrado Part Works Third: HMS Victory DelPrado Part Works 1/100 scale
Diorama of the Battle of the Brandywine from the American Revolutionary War Diorama of the Battle of New Falkland (unfinished sci-fi), Great War Centenary Diorama of the Messines Ridge Assault
Index for the Victory diary is on page 1
Gandale
#64 Posted : 06 May 2018 23:21:01

Rank: Super-Elite

Build-Diary Medal: Build-Diary Medal of HonourPublisher Medal: Article published MedalActive Service Medal: 500 post active service MedalPurple Medal: Super active service medal for 1000 postsRed Medal: Red MedalTurquoise Medal: Turquoise Medal for model making know-how contributionOutstanding Build: An award for an outstanding build
Groups: Administrators, Registered, Global Forum Support, Moderator, Official Builds, Administrator

Joined: 08/09/2012
Posts: 14,322
Points: 43,757
Location: Aberdeen
Some more really nice touches being shown Robin, all coming together beautifully.....Cool Cool

Regards

Alan
Markwarren
#65 Posted : 07 May 2018 09:24:54

Rank: Super-Elite

Build-Diary Medal: Build-Diary Medal of HonourPublisher Medal: Article published MedalActive Service Medal: 500 post active service MedalPurple Medal: Super active service medal for 1000 postsRed Medal: Red MedalTurquoise Medal: Turquoise Medal for model making know-how contributionOutstanding Build: An award for an outstanding build
Groups: Administrators, Global Forum Support, Registered, Moderator, Official Builds

Joined: 04/01/2016
Posts: 4,795
Points: 14,677
Location: Northamptonshire, England
Lovely work Robin.BigGrin

Mark
Plymouth57
#66 Posted : 20 May 2018 20:47:03

Rank: Elite

Build-Diary Medal: Build-Diary Medal of HonourActive Service Medal: 500 post active service MedalPurple Medal: Super active service medal for 1000 postsRed Medal: Red MedalTurquoise Medal: Turquoise Medal for model making know-how contributionOutstanding Build: An award for an outstanding build
Groups: Registered

Joined: 03/10/2012
Posts: 1,759
Points: 5,287
Location: Plympton
Thanks again to Alan and Mark!
Just a short update this time, I’ve had a major re-think on the torso construction! Originally I was going to have the head and torso as a single component with the arms as a separate section. After thinking about the shoulders however, I’ve decided to have the upper arms as a part of the torso mould with the forearms as the separate add-ons. The reasons for this are two fold – firstly it will make adding the epaulettes a lot easier as they would otherwise have extended just beyond where the shoulders presently end and secondly, as his forearms are bare with his shirtsleeves rolled up, that makes a logical joining position too.
I’ve also decided to try something a little different with the shirt as well. Having seen Godan’s Turok up close (and somewhat further along than his diary) I’m going to have a go at making the shirt creases in pva soaked tissue paper as Godan did with his ‘leathery wings’ (well, if you can’t nick good ideas off your friends …)BigGrin It may all turn out to be a huge mistake but if so I’ll just scrape it all off and run sheepishly back to my Milliput! In any case, the preparation is the same so here we go…
Photo 1 shows the basic head and torso before the first layer of Milliput. Around his neck is a cord made out of a short length of Victory’s thicker rigging thread. This simulates the cord holding his two ID tags although very little of it will be visible once the shirt is moulded around the neck! The early ID tags were very similar to the First World War tags, made of either stamped fibre or leather. Later on these were made from pressed metal as the acidic jungle soil was found to degrade the older tags within a short time, making identification of hastily buried KIA’s difficult when later exhumed for proper burial.
Photo 2 is after the next step with the first layer of Milliput epoxy putty mixed, rolled out flat and then applied in about four pieces to the front and back of the torso. What I forgot to mention was that the entire torso was given a good sanding over with a medium grade wet and dry to remove the shine of the resin and give the Milliput something to key onto. As I mentioned, most of that neck cord has gone from view but just enough of it will still be seen around the inside of the collar to need it in there! Finally for this instalment, Photo 3 shows the result of a great deal of sanding down with a coarse grade foam sanding block – nothing special (or expensive) – a pack of three grades from the local Toolshop store. I’ll say one thing for Milliput, it may go on easy but it’s a right old job to sand it back down again! This task was done outside during good weather to avoid all the dust in the workroom. Not easily visible at this angle is the lowest part of the torso where the belt will be added later, this has been sanded down the most to create a slightly sunken strip to accentuate the tissue paper folds to be added once the upper arms are finished. As its going to take a little while to get the arms moulded and cast, in the next instalment I’ll skip over to another section of the build – making up the base and pedestal to hold the eventual bust.
Until then, Happy Modelling to you All!


Robin.
Plymouth57 attached the following image(s):
Torso Detailling pic 1.JPG
First wooden ship: The Grimsby 12 Gun 'Frigate' by Constructo Second: Bounty DelPrado Part Works Third: HMS Victory DelPrado Part Works 1/100 scale
Diorama of the Battle of the Brandywine from the American Revolutionary War Diorama of the Battle of New Falkland (unfinished sci-fi), Great War Centenary Diorama of the Messines Ridge Assault
Index for the Victory diary is on page 1
Plymouth57
#67 Posted : 28 May 2018 17:27:43

Rank: Elite

Build-Diary Medal: Build-Diary Medal of HonourActive Service Medal: 500 post active service MedalPurple Medal: Super active service medal for 1000 postsRed Medal: Red MedalTurquoise Medal: Turquoise Medal for model making know-how contributionOutstanding Build: An award for an outstanding build
Groups: Registered

Joined: 03/10/2012
Posts: 1,759
Points: 5,287
Location: Plympton
The main part of the plinth / base is shown in Photo 1, this is a 4 inch square pre-shaped base in MDF. This one I bought on Ebay, and at only £2.45, trying to router one myself is pointless in both costs and time! (I’ve also sent for another one, 4 inches by 6 inches for the Cook 250 competition for only £2.75.) These bases are machined from an MDF ‘plank’ which means the top and bottom are nice and smooth but, as can be seen in Photo 2, the routered or shaped sides, in this instance ‘Ogee’ shaped are much rougher as the router bit ‘fluffs up’ the fibres. The solution to this is to repeatedly varnish, let dry and then sand down the edges until the varnish has filled in the texture and the sanding has made it smooth. The result of four applications of a water based acrylic varnish together with sanding down with a foam block sander is shown in Photo 3. You can also see the pencilled in lines to mark out the centre location for the upright pedestal in this shot. My intention was to glue a raised block in the centre shown by the impression in Photo 4. This would then form a locating lug for the pedestal to fit over on the final resin casting. The construction of the pedestal is illustrated in Diagram 5 – the parts are cut from a sheet of 1.5mm plasticard with a decorative border composed of a surrounding frame of 0.125 x 0.156mm Evergreen StripStyrene topped with a Plastruct 1.5mm Quarter Round (or Quadrant) with a small top border of just the Quadrant. There would be a false bottom inside the pedestal corresponding to the height of the locating lug and a solid top to fit the finished bust onto. The front face of the pedestal has three holes drilled through, blanked off on the inside to create locating pits for a plaque and campaign insignia. Hopefully you can follow what I’m describing here, if so – well done you! Now you can disregard all that because I changed it all in mid build!BigGrin
Photo 6 shows the start of the actual construction. Here we have the four sides of the pedestal in the 1.5mm plasticard – that bit hasn’t changed! You might notice some yellowy discolouration in the plastic, this sheet is over forty years old, rescued from the old garage workroom last year but still perfectly good condition despite the rain water leaks and mice! The sides are not mirror copies though, the pedestal is a slightly stretched rectangle and not a true square. The first sections of the lower decorative border are shown in Photo 7, and this is where the changes occurred. I had already glued the pedestal sides together and fitted in the false bottom and was trying to decide whether to make the locating lug out of square section plastic rod or a solid piece of plywood. Whilst making my mind up I began the border as seen here and suddenly realised I didn’t need an inner locator at all – by not gluing the border to the pedestal, but gluing it instead to the base, that was the locator! So in Photo 8 the plastic sections were test fitted to ensure they gave a tight joint and were then glued corner to corner, two at a time and carefully pressed up against the pedestal ensuring the Liquid Poly did NOT attach them to the uprights. This meant that the false bottom, which was no longer needed, now became a false top! The pedestal was turned upside down as shown in Photo 9 to become the locating valley into which a protruding plug now to be added to the bottom of the bust will fit. Sometimes the best solutions aren’t planned at all – they just evolve along the way!Blink The Plastruct quadrants were then cut to size and glued on the top of the border, butting up against the pedestal sides with the same precautions against accidental adhesion. Once all four sections were in place as in Photo 10, the finished border was super glued into position on the MDF base as seen in Photo 11. In the foreground are yet more pencil lines – these mark the position of the nameplate for the base and the positions of the two holes to be drilled in to take the nameplate’s locators.
In the next instalment, creating the plaques and the insignia.

Until then, Happy Modelling to you All!

Robin.
Plymouth57 attached the following image(s):
Base and Pedestal pic 1.JPG
Base and Pedestal pic 2.JPG
First wooden ship: The Grimsby 12 Gun 'Frigate' by Constructo Second: Bounty DelPrado Part Works Third: HMS Victory DelPrado Part Works 1/100 scale
Diorama of the Battle of the Brandywine from the American Revolutionary War Diorama of the Battle of New Falkland (unfinished sci-fi), Great War Centenary Diorama of the Messines Ridge Assault
Index for the Victory diary is on page 1
godan61
#68 Posted : 28 May 2018 19:52:36

Rank: Pro

Build-Diary Medal: Build-Diary Medal of HonourRed Medal: Red MedalCompetition Winner of Model Builds: Competition Winner of Model Builds
Groups: Registered

Joined: 26/12/2012
Posts: 140
Points: 428
Location: Plymouth
Looking good but what I'm really looking forward to is the clothing and the dreaded tissue technique
Plymouth57
#69 Posted : 28 May 2018 20:38:00

Rank: Elite

Build-Diary Medal: Build-Diary Medal of HonourActive Service Medal: 500 post active service MedalPurple Medal: Super active service medal for 1000 postsRed Medal: Red MedalTurquoise Medal: Turquoise Medal for model making know-how contributionOutstanding Build: An award for an outstanding build
Groups: Registered

Joined: 03/10/2012
Posts: 1,759
Points: 5,287
Location: Plympton
Yes - I bet you are!!BigGrin BigGrin BigGrin
The right arm is under way but its almost too hot in the attic to mix the rubber at the moment, let alone the resin!Flapper

Robin.
First wooden ship: The Grimsby 12 Gun 'Frigate' by Constructo Second: Bounty DelPrado Part Works Third: HMS Victory DelPrado Part Works 1/100 scale
Diorama of the Battle of the Brandywine from the American Revolutionary War Diorama of the Battle of New Falkland (unfinished sci-fi), Great War Centenary Diorama of the Messines Ridge Assault
Index for the Victory diary is on page 1
ian smith
#70 Posted : 29 May 2018 20:41:04

Rank: Super-Elite

Build-Diary Medal: Build-Diary Medal of HonourPublisher Medal: Article published MedalActive Service Medal: 500 post active service MedalPurple Medal: Super active service medal for 1000 postsRed Medal: Red Medal
Groups: Registered

Joined: 16/08/2010
Posts: 2,771
Points: 8,344
Location: Brighton
Cool Progressing nicely Robin.BigGrin
Current builds.Hachettes build the bismark,HMS Victory, HMS Hood.
Finished Builds Corel HMS Victory cross section.
Plymouth57
#71 Posted : 05 July 2018 20:54:54

Rank: Elite

Build-Diary Medal: Build-Diary Medal of HonourActive Service Medal: 500 post active service MedalPurple Medal: Super active service medal for 1000 postsRed Medal: Red MedalTurquoise Medal: Turquoise Medal for model making know-how contributionOutstanding Build: An award for an outstanding build
Groups: Registered

Joined: 03/10/2012
Posts: 1,759
Points: 5,287
Location: Plympton
Thanks again to Ian! Things are progressing but not as fast as intended. I've had a slight problem with the silicone rubber! I normally use the catalyst at 3% but decided to try some moulds using it at 2%. The bottle instructions go down to that level and all it should do is double the length of time to cure. The problem I had was that the rubber did indeed cure fully but it just won't take the release wax as before. You should be able to simply paint on layers or coats of the wax but at 2% it just goes into little droplets.Crying The pedestal mould was one of the affected, instead of a two part mould I ended up with a solid one! I was able to slice down one side to retrieve the plastic original and still use that mould to cast with - it worked pretty well in fact but I'll need to re-mould for the final version. The 'wonky' moulds were done at the height of the humid, thundery conditions, maybe the weather played a part in it. Never mind, onwards!

Photo 12 shows the spring tweezers placed inside the now completed four sided pedestal ‘box’. What you can’t see here is the small rectangle of 1mm plasticard being held tight against the inside face of the box as the liquid poly glue dries. Two such pieces were glued inside under the position of the twin name plate holes together with another two under the insignia locator hole, finally giving a thickness of 3mm to the pedestal at those points. Once the inserts were set in place the locator holes were drilled out with a 2.5mm bit to match the 2.5mm styrene rod I would later be using to form the studs on the rear of the nameplates. The actual lettering for the plates will be made up from the excellent ‘Slaters Plastikard Letters’ as shown in Photo 13. These are primarily designed for the model railway fraternity and are intended to create the old style cast-iron railway station nameplates. They come in a variety of sizes from (I think) 2mm and upwards. This particular set is the 8mm size although as you’ll see below, I also had to send off for a 6mm set afterwards. Some of the letters require a little cleaning up for flash along the sides but that’s fairly easy to do and the first set of letters were cut out to form the base title plate “The Chindit” and the pedestal plate “Burma 1943” as illustrated in Photo 14. This is where the little problem came in – The Chindit was fine, but Burma 1943 was fractionally too big to fit across the front face of the pedestal! Off went the order for a set of 6mm replacements, the difference in their sizes can be seen in Photo 15. These, allowing for the actual plate and the frame on which they sit were just the right size. Photos 16 and 17 show the main nameplate with the larger 8mm letters glued down. Note along the bottom there is a 1mm strip of flat styrene. This isn’t glued down but just placed into the recess of the plate and is there to provide a straight edge to align the bottom of the letters along. Once the wording is complete and stuck in place it will be removed before making the rubber mould. In the best traditions of penny-pinching modelling, the letters themselves are only ‘just’ glued down themselves. Each letter was given just three tiny dots of Deluxe Card Glue on the rear face before carefully placing it in position with precision tweezers. The letters only have to remain in place until the silicone mould is made. Those letters still attached to the plate after removal from the rubber mould will be removed by placing the plate in warm water to soften the pva glue. This means I can save the cost of replacing the frets of letters by re-using the same letters over and over (tight huh!)Flapper
The spacer strip is shown removed from the plate in Photo 18. The smaller pedestal plate with the 6mm lettering is pictured in Photo 19. This one had two strip spacers, one at the bottom as in the larger nameplate which spaced the ‘1943’ and one at the top to which ‘BURMA’ was lined up against. The little moulding box for the pedestal plate is seen in Photo 20. As you can see by the alignment holes in the plasticene, this little mould is a two parter just like its bigger brother, this is to cast in the two locating pins on the rear of the plate which drop into the moulded pits on the pedestal. The last item to be included on the base is a representation of the campaign medal which all Chindits would have received – the Burma Star. There are actual authentic Burma Stars available on Ebay, sadly probably from house clearances or whatever but I didn’t feel comfortable with using someone else’s hard won award for this project and so the medal and ribbon shown in Photo 21 is actually a reproduction, also available on Ebay to replace lost originals or for collectors (or me!)BigGrin This was also made up into a two part mould as shown in Photo 22, the resin version will have a single locating pin on the rear face to fix into the pedestal. Photo 23 illustrates the first half of the rubber mould with the Star still in place and with the styrene rod pin card-glued onto the centre (found by pencilling a line from opposite star points.
In the next instalment, completing the Burma Star silicone mould, and trial casting the pedestal components.
Until then Happy Modelling to you All!

Robin.
Plymouth57 attached the following image(s):
Base and Pedestal pic 3.JPG
Base and Pedestal pic 4.JPG
First wooden ship: The Grimsby 12 Gun 'Frigate' by Constructo Second: Bounty DelPrado Part Works Third: HMS Victory DelPrado Part Works 1/100 scale
Diorama of the Battle of the Brandywine from the American Revolutionary War Diorama of the Battle of New Falkland (unfinished sci-fi), Great War Centenary Diorama of the Messines Ridge Assault
Index for the Victory diary is on page 1
Markwarren
#72 Posted : 05 July 2018 22:06:07

Rank: Super-Elite

Build-Diary Medal: Build-Diary Medal of HonourPublisher Medal: Article published MedalActive Service Medal: 500 post active service MedalPurple Medal: Super active service medal for 1000 postsRed Medal: Red MedalTurquoise Medal: Turquoise Medal for model making know-how contributionOutstanding Build: An award for an outstanding build
Groups: Administrators, Global Forum Support, Registered, Moderator, Official Builds

Joined: 04/01/2016
Posts: 4,795
Points: 14,677
Location: Northamptonshire, England
Nice work Robin.ThumpUp

Mark
ian smith
#73 Posted : 05 July 2018 22:22:28

Rank: Super-Elite

Build-Diary Medal: Build-Diary Medal of HonourPublisher Medal: Article published MedalActive Service Medal: 500 post active service MedalPurple Medal: Super active service medal for 1000 postsRed Medal: Red Medal
Groups: Registered

Joined: 16/08/2010
Posts: 2,771
Points: 8,344
Location: Brighton
fantastic work Robin. look forward to seeing your progress. BigGrin Drool
Current builds.Hachettes build the bismark,HMS Victory, HMS Hood.
Finished Builds Corel HMS Victory cross section.
Plymouth57
#74 Posted : 19 July 2018 20:57:55

Rank: Elite

Build-Diary Medal: Build-Diary Medal of HonourActive Service Medal: 500 post active service MedalPurple Medal: Super active service medal for 1000 postsRed Medal: Red MedalTurquoise Medal: Turquoise Medal for model making know-how contributionOutstanding Build: An award for an outstanding build
Groups: Registered

Joined: 03/10/2012
Posts: 1,759
Points: 5,287
Location: Plympton
Many thanks to Mark and Ian! Progress has been slow at the moment due to the heatwave up in the attic workroom, even with a skylight and fan the temperature has been almost unbearable with glues and paints going hard before I can even use them!Crying This has also caused an unexpected problem with the resin and silicone as you'll see below but anyway, on we go (slowly)BigGrin

In Photo 24 we have, no, not my micro diorama of a Type VII U-Boat, but the second half of the Burma Star Medal mould under way. The Plastruct styrene rod see protruding from the liquid silicone rubber has been card-glued to the rear as shown last time and once the rubber is set it will be pulled out of the mould leaving a hollow tube. When ready to cast the medal I will pour slightly more resin into the mould than required to fill the impression and when the second half is placed on top the excess resin will (or should) be forced up the tube to cure taking any large air bubble with it and forming the locating pin in the process. Photo 25 illustrates the first half of the Pedestal mould. I first poured in a small amount of the rubber and let that set, forming a thin base. Then a first pouring of the main mould-making silicone was dribbled in to about 5mm in depth before placing the pedestal original in on top with the bottom end up against the lego brick wall. The rest of the liquid rubber was then poured in, carefully avoiding the weights placed on top of the pedestal to keep it from floating up. As you can see here, the rubber comes up to the half way point on the pedestal. The following Photo 26 shows that first half fully cured and with locating cut outs sliced out of the solid rubber along the sides to allow the second half to fit tightly. This is where the problems started! Up till now I’ve been using the silicone rubber mixed with 3% catalyst. For this mould I decided to try dropping it down to 2% (which is perfectly acceptable according to the label on the bottle). The problem came when I tried to paint on the liquid wax to form the release layer, preventing the two halves of the mould bonding together. As you can make out in the blown up Photo 27, the wax didn’t spread across the rubber in an even layer or coat. Instead it went into beads as seen here. I gave it the three coats as usual and each time I had the same result. I had a nasty feeling this was going to be a problem but I went ahead and tried the second half of the rubber anyway. Note the three blobs of rubber added to the locating holes in the pedestal – this avoids getting any air bubbles trapped in there on the second pouring! As expected, instead of a two part mould I ended up with a solid one part! Fortunately, by some careful cutting and slicing with the snap off craft knife I was able to retrieve the original and still use the mould to trial the resin casting as shown in Photo 28. The pedestal was cast using the Roto Resin (the pour and rotate method) to end up with a hollow casting as seen here. This was a slightly different technique however consisting of five separate mixes of resin. The first was mixed, poured and ‘sloshed’ around, covering all the surfaces until the resin began to stiffen up and then the mould was stood on its end allowing the resin to collect at the top of the pedestal. The remaining four mixes were also spread around the inside, concentrating on the four sides and allowing the resin to finally collect with the mould on its side, depositing the last of the resin on each side in turn. This substantially increases the thickness of each side without having to add more and more layers! Considering the mould is a ‘reject’ the end result was pretty good, only the side with the ‘brick-cut’ was left with a marred surface as you can just make out on the left side of the casting. I have since discovered the cause of the wax problem, which I’ll explain later so I’ll be making a ‘proper’ two part mould to replace this one later on. And so for the results – Photos 29 – 31 shows the castings alongside their lower moulds. The only slight problem was the smaller ‘Burma’ plate where I got the two locating pegs about 0.25mm out of alignment, the result being they won’t both fit in the holes! There was a simple remedy though, cut one off and sand it smooth! ‘The Chindit’ plate fitted perfectly into its holes however and the Burma Star, having only one peg anyway also fitted well!BigGrin Finally, in Photo 32 we have the trial set of castings all in place, the Burma plate holding on with its one peg, the Burma Star hanging in below and The Chindit located on the MDF base. I now have to make a simple one piece mould for the base itself so that it too can be hollow cast using the same method as the pedestal. More on that later!
As for that problem with the un-waxable silicone moulds, it turned out that it was nothing to do with the rubber mixture at all, it was the liquid wax itself. During a brief pause in this heatwave, the temperature in the attic reduced back to the mid seventies instead of the high nineties as it has been for a few weeks now. I managed to create the nameplate for the Endeavour cannon diorama by using a little pot of Poundshop Vaseline and rubbing that over the rubber by fingertip as the liquid wax was still beading up (it felt like trying to model ON the Barrier Reef at times up there)! With the temperature back down to more comfortable levels I tried the liquid wax on the first mould that gave me trouble and lo and behold it worked perfectly. The whole problem was caused by trying to paint the wax when it was over ninety degrees – presumably the silicone was also over ninety as well so that might contribute to it. It looks like I’ll have to make the second half of further moulds downstairs where its cooler, at least for the summer anyway!Blink
In the next instalment, starting the right arm (as long as the ruddy Milliput hasn’t cooked itself solid that is!)
Until then, Happy Melting to you All!

Robin.
Plymouth57 attached the following image(s):
Base and Pedestal pic 5.JPG
Base and Pedestal pic 6.JPG
First wooden ship: The Grimsby 12 Gun 'Frigate' by Constructo Second: Bounty DelPrado Part Works Third: HMS Victory DelPrado Part Works 1/100 scale
Diorama of the Battle of the Brandywine from the American Revolutionary War Diorama of the Battle of New Falkland (unfinished sci-fi), Great War Centenary Diorama of the Messines Ridge Assault
Index for the Victory diary is on page 1
godan61
#75 Posted : 22 July 2018 20:30:00

Rank: Pro

Build-Diary Medal: Build-Diary Medal of HonourRed Medal: Red MedalCompetition Winner of Model Builds: Competition Winner of Model Builds
Groups: Registered

Joined: 26/12/2012
Posts: 140
Points: 428
Location: Plymouth
At least the pva on the tissue will dry quick when you do the arms
ian smith
#76 Posted : 24 July 2018 14:46:18

Rank: Super-Elite

Build-Diary Medal: Build-Diary Medal of HonourPublisher Medal: Article published MedalActive Service Medal: 500 post active service MedalPurple Medal: Super active service medal for 1000 postsRed Medal: Red Medal
Groups: Registered

Joined: 16/08/2010
Posts: 2,771
Points: 8,344
Location: Brighton
Stand looks very impressive Robin. well doneCool BigGrin
Current builds.Hachettes build the bismark,HMS Victory, HMS Hood.
Finished Builds Corel HMS Victory cross section.
Plymouth57
#77 Posted : 24 July 2018 19:59:27

Rank: Elite

Build-Diary Medal: Build-Diary Medal of HonourActive Service Medal: 500 post active service MedalPurple Medal: Super active service medal for 1000 postsRed Medal: Red MedalTurquoise Medal: Turquoise Medal for model making know-how contributionOutstanding Build: An award for an outstanding build
Groups: Registered

Joined: 03/10/2012
Posts: 1,759
Points: 5,287
Location: Plympton
Many thanks for that Ian! I just wish this heatwave would ease off a bit - so many good intentions, so little energy!Blink
And as for you Mr "At least the pva on the tissue will dry quick when you do the arms" Godan! Cheeky so and so!BigGrin "May your armatures prove insufficient!" (Hee hee)BigGrin Flapper Flapper LOL

Robin
First wooden ship: The Grimsby 12 Gun 'Frigate' by Constructo Second: Bounty DelPrado Part Works Third: HMS Victory DelPrado Part Works 1/100 scale
Diorama of the Battle of the Brandywine from the American Revolutionary War Diorama of the Battle of New Falkland (unfinished sci-fi), Great War Centenary Diorama of the Messines Ridge Assault
Index for the Victory diary is on page 1
Plymouth57
#78 Posted : 16 August 2018 20:18:09

Rank: Elite

Build-Diary Medal: Build-Diary Medal of HonourActive Service Medal: 500 post active service MedalPurple Medal: Super active service medal for 1000 postsRed Medal: Red MedalTurquoise Medal: Turquoise Medal for model making know-how contributionOutstanding Build: An award for an outstanding build
Groups: Registered

Joined: 03/10/2012
Posts: 1,759
Points: 5,287
Location: Plympton
Back again after a long pause! The attic workroom has been like an oven during the heatwave but at long last its back to a more comfortable level (mind you, the heat was great for making the plasticene nice and soft for the mould bases!)BigGrin

The right arm was a bit of a learning curve and I was doing so much learning I didn’t take as many photos as I should so I’ll try and fill in the gaps with the other arm later. Photo 1 shows the action figure arm laying in the first half of the silicon rubber mould. To get to this stage I had first worked out the pose of the arm after first removing the attached hand (by unscrewing the two screws in the forearm). With the pose decided on I then applied standard white silicon sealer of the type used in kitchen and bathrooms and filled in around the joints, this was to prevent the liquid silicon from flowing into the arm through the moveable bits on the elbow and shoulder. The silicon probably wouldn’t have gone into the shoulder as the joints were really tight but this way I could fill in the shoulder gaps to eventually fill with resin, strengthening the overall shoulder for attachment to the torso. The white silicon was given a couple of coats of wax release agent – the second arm will receive a thicker application though, that liquid rubber loves bonding to the white stuff! Photo 2 illustrates the completed two halves of the mould. The first half had its edges sliced down to produce a channel to form the locating lugs instead of the usual pegs and holes (no plasticene in this mould) and after the problems I had with using the liquid wax in 90 degree + temperatures, I smeared some Vaseline over the first half mould to be sure of separation when the other half had cured. This worked pretty well thankfully although on the initial mould on the left, you can see where the white silicon wasn’t so keen to be released! At the top of this photo you can see one of the set of paper punches I bought for the Sopwith Pup build last year. This was used to punch out a channel through the centre of the shoulder joint, shown larger in Photo 5 and would be the pouring hole for the resin casting later. The first casting is shown in Photo 3 alongside the original. To cast the arm I first poured the mixed resin into the initial mould (the one without the hole in it) and poked around the wrist with a cocktail stick ensuring the resin had gone into the air pocket. I could then quickly put the two halves of the mould together and stand it upright allowing the liquid resin to collect at the bottom or forearm. When the first pouring had cured I then mixed up another batch and poured that in through the punched hole to fill up the rest of the mould. Unfortunately I’m far more used to casting little tiny things than this great lump and it actually took three more mixes to fill the thing up, that’s no problem however – liquid resin will bond straight on to cured resin to produce a strong joint. The next step was to sand down the rough areas caused by the white silicon and then to mix up superfine white Milliput to re-model the elbow joint as seen in Photo 4. At the same time I also filled in around the shoulder to reduce the subsequent amount of Milliput required to blend the upper arm into the torso later. Notice the moulded screw hole in the upper arm, this could be left as it will be covered by the Milliput shirt sleeve later. Also the join line of the forearm/upper arm is now the guide line for sawing off the forearm which comes next.
The arm is shown after the Milliput had fully cured and was ready for the ‘amputation’ in Photo 6. The pencil mark indicated by the arrow was an attempt to ensure that the arm would be fitted back in the correct position later on, in the final casting the forearm/hand/machete will be a separate casting to the combined torso/upper arm. Photo 7 illustrates the cut off forearm with the centre drilled out to accept a length of brass tubing to form the locating peg. This however was changed later as I decided that the tube wasn’t either long enough or thick enough to do the job. Another change took place at the shoulder join too! Originally I intended to carve away the outer disk of resin which formed the inner part of the action figure moving joint, (kept in place by the two halves of the torso) leaving a thick peg of resin to be inserted into an equally wide hole drilled into the torso. I then decided that such a large hole might weaken the hollow resin torso and instead drilled a smaller hole in each shoulder joined by a protruding aluminium tube as seen in Photo 8, this shows the right hand side, a similar amount of tube also sticks out the other side. I then drilled out a corresponding sized hole in the upper arm into which the aluminium tube was epoxy glued. This time the registration marks were incised into the arm and shoulder with the razor saw as seen here in Photo 9. There is also a horrendous air bubble in the top of the arm but, as with the sawn lines this doesn’t matter as the whole area will be covered in Milliput soon! Remember that brass tube in the forearm, which I thought wasn’t big enough? By sheer coincidence the larger aluminium tube used in the shoulders slides tightly over the brass one so I simply cut a longer piece of that and epoxied it over the inner brass tube to create a stronger peg. Finally (as that Action Man ad leaps back into my head again) Photo 10 shows the glued on upper arm completed with its sculpted on skin of Milliput. This was taken after some extensive sanding back with coarse grade foam sanding blocks, this will be the base onto which I can PVA the tissue paper to create the folds and creases of the shirt. The intension is to model those folds and, whilst still wet or soft, to fit the DecraLed cross straps of the webbing and the waist belt so they appear to naturally ‘sit’ over the cloth shirt beneath – that’s the plan anyhow! In the next installment, I’ll be carrying on with the other arm to complete the basic torso ready for that ruddy tissue.
Until then, Happy Modelling to you All!

Robin.
Plymouth57 attached the following image(s):
Right Arm pic 1.JPG
Right Arm pic 2.JPG
First wooden ship: The Grimsby 12 Gun 'Frigate' by Constructo Second: Bounty DelPrado Part Works Third: HMS Victory DelPrado Part Works 1/100 scale
Diorama of the Battle of the Brandywine from the American Revolutionary War Diorama of the Battle of New Falkland (unfinished sci-fi), Great War Centenary Diorama of the Messines Ridge Assault
Index for the Victory diary is on page 1
Gandale
#79 Posted : 16 August 2018 22:39:29

Rank: Super-Elite

Build-Diary Medal: Build-Diary Medal of HonourPublisher Medal: Article published MedalActive Service Medal: 500 post active service MedalPurple Medal: Super active service medal for 1000 postsRed Medal: Red MedalTurquoise Medal: Turquoise Medal for model making know-how contributionOutstanding Build: An award for an outstanding build
Groups: Administrators, Registered, Global Forum Support, Moderator, Official Builds, Administrator

Joined: 08/09/2012
Posts: 14,322
Points: 43,757
Location: Aberdeen
Looks great Robin, very interesting methods you employ.....Cool Cool

Regards

Alan
Markwarren
#80 Posted : 16 August 2018 23:01:38

Rank: Super-Elite

Build-Diary Medal: Build-Diary Medal of HonourPublisher Medal: Article published MedalActive Service Medal: 500 post active service MedalPurple Medal: Super active service medal for 1000 postsRed Medal: Red MedalTurquoise Medal: Turquoise Medal for model making know-how contributionOutstanding Build: An award for an outstanding build
Groups: Administrators, Global Forum Support, Registered, Moderator, Official Builds

Joined: 04/01/2016
Posts: 4,795
Points: 14,677
Location: Northamptonshire, England
Nice work Robin.Cool

Mark
Users browsing this topic
Guest
8 Pages «<23456>»
Forum Jump  
You cannot post new topics in this forum.
You cannot reply to topics in this forum.
You cannot delete your posts in this forum.
You cannot edit your posts in this forum.
You cannot create polls in this forum.
You cannot vote in polls in this forum.

Powered by YAF | YAF © 2003-2009, Yet Another Forum.NET
This page was generated in 0.455 seconds.
DeAgostini