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Up-grading the Del Prado 1/100 Victory Options
sparks
#261 Posted : 12 August 2013 19:55:02

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Plymouth57 wrote:
Hmmm, yeah! That makes two of us!! BigGrin

Robin



LOL I'm sure you will find a way to do it.
regards
Alan
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Plymouth57
#262 Posted : 14 August 2013 18:46:55

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Thanks to Nigel and our Alans for that, have to admit the 1/100 scale does bring in a lot more problems than the larger ones - but it's all good fun (innit?)Blink
I think the fire buckets might involve some more mini lathe experiments but we'll see when we get there, I'll probably carry on back along the poop deck first but I'll need to get another pack of gratings soon!

As I mentioned earlier, I have been thinking of how to make the hammock frames construction a little easier for the dozens of frame elements which will be lining the tops of the bulwarks. The problem with them so far is that, like a blacksmith, I have been making each one of them by hand as an individual piece. It’s perfectly do-able as you can see from the earlier posts but, just like in the time of Nelson, it would be far easier to have them running off a new fangled production line from one of them Manufactorys (the original name for a Factory in Horatio's time! I'm getting a little mixed up with my threads here!)Blink
After some deliberation I have come up with the little gizmo below, that’s right, it’s time for another jig! BigGrin
The cobbled up creation shown below is just a very basic thing designed to make the hammock frames for the forecastle and quarterdeck hammock nets and possibly the second attempt at the waist barricade net too. The poop deck frames will be slightly wider I think so I’ll need to either adapt this jig or make a second more elaborate one.

Photo 1 shows the jig in it’s entirety, as you can see it’s extremely simple, just two square bits of wood screwed onto a wooden base, all from scrap wood. The hardest working part is shown in Photo 2, a pair of brass ‘U’ channels inset into the wood block and super glued in place. If you can remember back to my diary when I was making up those ruddy curved head timbers, you’ll remember I came up with the idea of using hollow brass channel filled with solder to create the grooved timbers which arc up below the Catheads – well here’s some of what was left over!
Photo 3 shows the jig in action. The two wooden blocks are screwed into the base leaving a gap between them, this gap, including the grooves set back into the wooden blocks equates to the width of the hammock frames to be made up. The photo shows a length of Sapele wooden plank left over from the Grimsby being used to force the brass wire down into the gap and into the brass channels. At the bottom you can see a length of brass square rod used to reinforce the base. I found the first trial pieces would get too rounded a base profile so I came up with the brass rod slipped in the bottom and then a simple tool made up from a piece of round brass dowel with two flats filed into the end so that it just fitted into the gap.
Photo 4 shows this tool in action, after the Sapele plank has forced the wire into place the brass dowel is then gently tapped down with a lightweight jewellers hammer (a ‘Toolbox’ £1 special!). The result of all this is as seen in Photo 5, a preformed brass frame with a flat base of the correct width. All that remained then was to carefully straighten the uprights into a vertical position with long nosed pliers to produce the final frame ready to be soldered into the brass hammock frame set up.
All the tools required to produce as many as I need can be seen in the final photo: the jig itself, a coil of brass wire, the wooden ‘pusher’ plank (I’ll cut this down to a short length soon), the filed down brass dowel base-straightener (probably cut this down as well) and the jewellers hammer to tap the dowel in with.
For the future I’d like to make another version of this, maybe a little larger with the longer wooden strip slotted down the middle with a couple of bolts and wing nuts fitted down through the slot to secure it to the base. All I would need to do then was make up the first frame by hand, fit that in to the fixed groove and slide the other groove up to it, tighten the wingnuts and off we go! A fully adjustable frame jig!

With all this experimenting, I haven’t actually done anything to the Vic today! Blushing

See you soon.

Robin


Plymouth57 attached the following image(s):
Hammock Frame Jig Pic.JPG
First wooden ship: The Grimsby 12 Gun 'Frigate' by Constructo Second: Bounty DelPrado Part Works Third: HMS Victory DelPrado Part Works 1/100 scale
Diorama of the Battle of the Brandywine from the American Revolutionary War Diorama of the Battle of New Falkland (unfinished sci-fi), Great War Centenary Diorama of the Messines Ridge Assault
Index for the Victory diary is on page 1
Gandale
#263 Posted : 14 August 2013 22:04:17

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Love your simple but very effective jig, in fact I think all your improvised jigs are superb..... Very nice work Robin.... Cool Cool

Regards

Alan
moriarty
#264 Posted : 15 August 2013 22:09:36

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Still watching with great interest Robin. Some of your ideas are just magic. She,s looking good though. Fancy doing it all again with my effort then LOL BigGrin
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Plymouth57
#265 Posted : 15 August 2013 22:22:07

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NO, NO, NO! Crying Crying Flapper

Thanks for the great comments guys! Necessity is the Mother of Invention and Penniless-ness is the Mother of everything else! BigGrin

Here comes another experiment!

Today I have actually done something to the Victory! This was another ‘experiment’ as are most of my answers to the various (and many) upgrades and scratchbuilds. Although I’ve been modelling in various mediums from plastic kits to white metal miniatures, Victory is only my third wooden ship and by far the most complicated with much of her having to be not only created from scratch but also the means to that creation having to be designed in most cases too!
This post is another of those ‘What If’s’ which I have to admit, although it was really fiddly to do, has worked out really well and was, apart from certain things snapping off at the wrong time, quite fun to do as well!
The subject of this little exercise was the actual hammocks to fit inside the hammock nets around the sides and other areas of a man of war in action. Many other models have just the hammock frames and netting on the sides and they look just as good that way too, in my case however, with crew figures running all around the ship (eventually), engaged in the battle of Trafalgar, those nets should be full of rolled up hammocks to protect the little Jolly Jack Tars from the perfidious Frenchie sharpshooters and canister shot.
To those real newbies just getting into this wonderful hobby, a quick explanation of the main material used for this project – Milliput. Milliput is what is known as an Epoxy Putty, this is a material which, just like epoxy glues, comes in two parts which have to be mixed together in order to be used and harden off. Today there are dozens of such putties available used for everything from modelling to repairing cars and sealing leaks, Milliput has been around for donkey’s years and was one of the first examples to be available to the general public. Originally there was just one Milliput, a pale pea green in colour and designed to be used for all of the above, this was the modeller’s sculpting medium that I grew up with from my youth. Today however, Milliput comes in a variety of forms: Original, Fine Grade, Superfine Grade, White, Silver-Grey, Terracotta (for repairing ornate ceramic plant pots) and now even in Black. The material comes in little cardboard boxes containing two ‘sausages’ of putty six inches long. To use the stuff just cut off an equal amount from each roll and thoroughly mix and knead them together until the two colours have blended into one. You then have about 30 minutes while the putty remains sticky to the touch and about an hour until it begins to stiffen up. Sometimes it is hard within a couple of hours, sometimes it takes overnight, I think it depends a lot on the temperature and humidity but either way this is a chemical reaction which once begun can’t be stopped. It will also take place under water too, hence it’s application in stopping leaks!
Ok, introduction aside, for this little experiment I used the Silver-Grey Milliput. I could have used the superfine white but the Silver-Grey was my last purchase and therefore the freshest and least likely to ‘not harden’ as can happen with out of date putty. All the hammocks in the top picture below were made from two discs of the putty less than 2mm thick mixed together, this stuff, although over a fiver for a box, will last a very long time (that’s why my old stocks always go way past their ‘best by’ dates) Once mixed and blended, the putty was rolled out into a couple of long thin sausages and left to begin the hardening reaction whilst I made up the next tool. This is simply a coiled up cylinder of metal foil also visible in that first photo. The metal foil came from a tube of plastic wood putty, which had gone rock hard over the years. In my model soldier days I used to make their belts and rifle slings out of the metal foil from salvaged toothpaste tubes – then some H&S idiot went and changed the tubes to useless plastic. These tubes are either a form of lead or aluminium alloy, I think the wood putty tube is aluminium as it’s a little stiffer than the old lead varieties. I cut a narrow strip and coiled it around a thin drill bit to form the roll which once formed was used to push into the still soft end of the putty sausage to imprint an impression of the end of the rolled up hammock.
After this I then gently pushed the 0.5mm brass wire into the centre of the hammock end to hold it for insertion into the netting. This also had the effect of distorting the shape of the hammock a little so it was rolled out again with the wire still stuck in it and trimmed to shape if required.
Now came the paintbrush handle! The gap between the netting rails was actually a little thinner than before, probably due to handling it when I sewed in the netting. It was necessary therefore to gently push the tip of the handle between the two ‘rails’ pushing them slightly apart and with them spread, the hammock still impaled on its brass wire was introduced into the gap and pushed down inside. Once in place the paintbrush was pulled out again and the netting frame contracted back in, trapping the hammock, which then allowed the brass wire to be gently pulled free. I then used either the brass wire or a thicker sewing needle to lever the hammock upright if it was lop sided and then repeated the procedure down the line of the netting frame. In some cases I applied the foil cylinder again on top of the hammock if the coiled impression had diminished.
And that was it! The only problems I encountered were fairly easily fixable, the first hammocks I inserted didn’t have a large enough gap and they pulled the netting down with them (on the right of Photo 2) I’m going to cut a couple of netting off cuts to cover up the gaps to fix that. Secondly the entire netting frame came away from the barricade right at the end so I had to super glue it back again – no great problem. The third problem was logistical! The final hammock on the right of the frame is missing. The simple reason for that was there’s nowhere to stick the brush handle in to spread the frame apart! I’ll sort something out for the remaining frames, but for this one I’ll have a crew member running up the steps carrying his hammock to complete the group!!
Although I’m working in the diminutive 1/100 scale, this method would work just fine in just about any scale. And one last thing, although the milliput is Silver-Grey, there’s very little silver or grey visible, it comes out as a slightly off white colour, in fact almost the exact colour of canvas – so it doesn’t even need to be painted!

Happy Building to All!

Robin
Plymouth57 attached the following image(s):
Hammocks Pic.JPG
First wooden ship: The Grimsby 12 Gun 'Frigate' by Constructo Second: Bounty DelPrado Part Works Third: HMS Victory DelPrado Part Works 1/100 scale
Diorama of the Battle of the Brandywine from the American Revolutionary War Diorama of the Battle of New Falkland (unfinished sci-fi), Great War Centenary Diorama of the Messines Ridge Assault
Index for the Victory diary is on page 1
jase
#266 Posted : 15 August 2013 22:35:22

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Very nicely done. it certainly looks the part Love

J
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Gandale
#267 Posted : 15 August 2013 22:51:17

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Different, innovative and brilliant.... Drool Drool .. Nice one Robin....Cool Cool
Plymouth57
#268 Posted : 24 August 2013 20:45:09

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Thanks Jase and Alan, appreciated as always!Blushing

The next section concerns a major upgrade to the basic kit part which I have been thinking about for some time - the Poop Deck Skylight.

The construction of the skylight has eventually turned into a major exercise! Initially I had intended to follow a very similar path to the scratch built binnacle, ie, using a block of Perspex for the main body and building the rest of the frame over that. However, after seeing Sparks diary and the need for a subtle curve in the roof of the skylight, I decided to go the whole hog and build the entire thing out of timber. As it happens, my convex curve is a lot more subtle than Sparks’ and although it is present, is almost unnoticeable! Doing that in Perspex however would have required sanding the block to shape and then re-polishing the top back to transparency – and I’d probably still be doing it now! Crying
The decision was made therefore to use a commercial grating pack for the basic ‘box’ shape. I was very lucky the following weekend, I’d noticed that the ship building accessory packs had been getting a bit on the low side in my local Plymouth model shop and didn’t have much hope that I’d find what I wanted but no, there on the wall was at least half a dozen packs! I only needed the one (thank goodness) it’s been a while since I bought any of the Constructo accessory packs, the packets were priced at £1.55, the grating pack was now £2.75! Having seen how one of our diary members scratch builds the things, a model table saw looks a ruddy good buy for the future!
Anyhow, enough of ‘inflationary’ matters, here’s how the build went – Blink

Photos 1 and 2 shows the original solid metal DelPrado kit skylight alongside the first stages of producing the wooden grating upgrade. In 1, the wooden lathes are simply placed together in their slots, in 2 they have been glued together with a drop of super glue on each joint and then trimmed to size with a safety razor blade. As far as the kit part went, it wasn’t too bad regarding overall size, lengthways it was spot on, width and height it was a little undersize but not so much that you’d notice.
Photo 3 Illustrates the trimmed grating framed with 1mm square wooden strip together with the basic lower frame made from 2mm strip (both from CMB). The roof frame was then given a very slight convex curve by carefully sanding it down with medium and fine sand paper. Great care is need in doing this, because of the way the grating is formed, it is impossible to sand with the grain on one set of strips without going across the grain on the others, this can lead to splitting of the fragile strips so only light pressure and not too coarse a sandpaper! The next step was the most fiddly part of the whole exercise. Four pieces of the 1mm strip were cut to 5mm lengths to form the four corners of the frame, in theory, you could cut all 28 vertical posts at the same time as long as you can get every one of them identical (I’m thinking a jig of some sort here!) but I found it far easier to just get four of them exactly the same size and go on from there. Those four corner posts were glued into place with PVA, carefully keeping them dead in line and vertical and once they were dry I carefully attached the ‘posted’ bottom base to the grating roof. It took a few tries to get it right, the first attempt had me sticking the posts just in from the edge of the bottom frame only to discover that the roof wouldn’t fit on top of them! But after replacing them at the extreme corners that was rectified and eventually it was done and left to dry. Once dry I re-examined the now 3D frame and found that unfortunately it had acquired a very slight ‘lean’ on one side. It was hardly noticeable to be honest but you know what we’re like! Shouldn’t be too difficult to gently push the frame back into true. Ever seen a flat-packed skylight? Not a pretty sight! So anyway, four re-re-positioned corner posts later I was ready to continue.
Photo 3 shows the result of the next stage, the line of vertical frame members were individually cut to length, not so short that they could fall out and just long enough that they would lightly wedge themselves in place. Each one was used to cut the next one to size before being fixed in place with a drop of PVA. Photo 3 shows the position after the first side was completed.
In Photo 5 we see the alterations to be done to the actual poop deck itself. Being a skylight of course, there is nothing underneath it apart from the deck support beams in order to admit the daylight to the deck below. This would require ‘removal’ of part of the deck to simulate the opening below. Once the basic frame of the skylight as in Photo 4 was done, it could be used to draw out the outline of the skylight onto the deck using the McKay reference book for the actual measurements. I had mistakenly thought that the deck planking was made up of thin veneer as in the Grimsby, I’d forgotten that the deck wood was actually made of strakes just as thick as the plywood false decks beneath (all the places where the deck thickness was visible had been covered over with the edging boards by this time!) Consequently, it took a lot more effort and care to slice down through those planks to expose the plywood base as shown in Photo 4. Also shown are the four pieces of the wooden side frames, which will later support the skylight. These were made up from some of the DelPrado kit wooden planks.
Photo 6 shows the conversion of the poop deck for Nelson’s swimming pool! Well, not quite but it did look like the Victory was being converted into a luxury cruise ship! After the planking was removed and the plywood lightly sanded down it was given two coats of a Citadel pale blue acrylic. Not sure what the actual name of the paint is, the label has peeled off the plastic bottle after all these years. Once that was dry, the bottom frame members shown earlier were given a coat of Admiralty Wood (Walnut) and PVA’d into place once dry. The three deck beams were then cut to size and similarly painted before gluing down in place as seen in Photo 7.
At this point I checked the fit of the skylight on top of the frame, it fitted perfectly but on checking the dimensions against the McKay drawings I found that with the lower frame in place, the entire skylight was just over a mm too high! That left me with three options – sand down the bottom of the skylight base itself – that base was only 2mm thick to begin with, removing half of it would severely weaken the structure and I definitely wasn’t going through that again! Remove half from the skylight base and half from the poop deck base – do-able, but would have to be dead accurate and level to avoid tilting or ‘rocking’ the frame afterwards. The preferred option number three – remove all the required excess wood from the poop deck frame. This is shown in Photo 8. The white areas are low tack masking tapes put down to protect the deck. The ‘proud’ parts of the frame was sliced off with a safety razor blade and finished off with my mini rotary sander with the detail sander (triangular) pad added on to it. One word of advice here, if you are intending to do this ‘excavation’ work on your poop deck, do it before you add the poop deck barricade hammock netting! God! Does that stuff get in the way, how I never broke it off I’ll never know!
In Photo 9 we’re back to the skylight frame again, this time fitting on the opposite side vertical frames. These proved a little more difficult than the first set. I have no idea why, but the grating ends on this side appeared to protrude about half a mm further than the other side requiring that each little 5mm post had to have a cut out to allow it to fit up tight to the grating and also sit on the bottom strip. This procedure is under way in Photo 9, with a shaped post sitting in front of a Swiss Army Cocktail Stick and the tweezers used to place each post in position.
Photo 10 shows the completed framework after all the above work just before the final light sanding with very fine wet and dry.
Photo 11 is virtually the same but with the final addition of an extra outer frame of 1mm wooden strip around the bottom of the frame base, this is a cosmetic extra designed to increase the area available for gluing to the poop deck base and also to cover up any slight inaccuracies in the cuts to the decking itself (sneaky huh!)
To finally complete the skylight frame it was first painted with the Admiralty Walnut and once dry, given a wash over with Citadel Skaven Brown water based ink. The photos I have seen of the real thing appear to look like a darker varnished wood, possibly mahogany? And the Walnut and Skaven ink wash simulates this really well as can be seen in the picture of the finished frame in Photo 12.
The final task before fixing the wooden skylight into place on the poop is to glaze in the window panes, this was achieved using the Micro Kristal Kleer liquid ‘glass’ as can be seen in Photo 13. The Kristal Kleer is first applied on the tip of a cocktail stick and moved around each hole coating the sides before a second, bigger drop of the material is placed in the hole and rapidly moved around, touching each of the four sides and leaving a white skin stretched across the hole as the cocktail stick is removed. It sometimes takes a few attempts to get it right though. The Kristal is supposed to cover in a window up to a ¼” square, the largest windows in this frame are just under that size but it was literally ‘touch and go’ on some of them! As this PVA based material dries it goes clear, ending up with a lovely representation of 18th Cent leaded glass.
The final result is shown in Photo 14. As I said, the convex roof is very subtle indeed but it is there! Overall I’m very pleased with the final appearance, it was a lot of very finicky work but a vast improvement over the original. I’m just really glad the old Victory only has one of them! Blink

Happy Building to All

Robin

Plymouth57 attached the following image(s):
Skylight Pt 1 pic1.JPG
Skylight Pt 2 pic.JPG
Skylight Pt 3 pic.JPG
First wooden ship: The Grimsby 12 Gun 'Frigate' by Constructo Second: Bounty DelPrado Part Works Third: HMS Victory DelPrado Part Works 1/100 scale
Diorama of the Battle of the Brandywine from the American Revolutionary War Diorama of the Battle of New Falkland (unfinished sci-fi), Great War Centenary Diorama of the Messines Ridge Assault
Index for the Victory diary is on page 1
NMBROOK
#269 Posted : 24 August 2013 21:17:45

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That skylight is a work of art Robin,love itLove Love .I have seen Kristal Klear used on many builds and it remains cloudy even when thoroughly dry,I guess they must be putting too thick a coat on.The glazing on yours looks spot on.I love the miliput hammocks as well,very innovative.
Kind Regards Nigel
Plymouth57
#270 Posted : 24 August 2013 23:12:00

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Many thanks for that Nigel! Blushing

That's strange about the Kristal Kleer staying cloudy. I had to apply pretty thick coats on the skylight to get the spaces to cover, any thinner and the centres would keep dropping out (like a bubble bursting) On some of the ones that looked like they might burst I even dribbled a little more on top!
I did notice some time back, on my stern gallery windows which were also kristal kleered, I had a couple of small paint splats which I removed whilst still wet with a damp brush tip, the windows beside the splatt went cloudy again whilst they were damp but dried perfectly clear afterwards. I wonder if its anything to do with the humidity in the room where the models were? I'm sure I remember the first bottle of Kleer I bought many years ago having instructions on the bottle to coat the finished window with clear varnish to protect the surface - the new bottle doesn't mention it at all so maybe they've improved the formula so the new version doesn't cloud as much?
Its very strange!Confused
Many thanks for looking in.

Robin
First wooden ship: The Grimsby 12 Gun 'Frigate' by Constructo Second: Bounty DelPrado Part Works Third: HMS Victory DelPrado Part Works 1/100 scale
Diorama of the Battle of the Brandywine from the American Revolutionary War Diorama of the Battle of New Falkland (unfinished sci-fi), Great War Centenary Diorama of the Messines Ridge Assault
Index for the Victory diary is on page 1
Gandale
#271 Posted : 24 August 2013 23:24:55

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Truly artistic work Robin, can only imagine how long it took you to put the skylight together..... Brilliant work and another beautifully explained method.... Love it.....Love Love Love

Regards

Alan
moriarty
#272 Posted : 25 August 2013 12:53:04

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ThumpUp Very nice work Rob, definately pulling out the stops on this one. Got given another Victory but the hull is missing so I might start the other again. I think it is an Amati 1/98 scale and a lot of the parts are very similar to this partwork. I reckon they can be intermingled and maybe get a half decent ship out of it. I will post some pics later on my build of this one later so you can see the similarities. One good thing is I now have a wealth of plans to continue with the renovation build BigGrin . Good work Rob, keep it upCool
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sparks
#273 Posted : 26 August 2013 21:21:07

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Lovely work and some good ideas on the skylight Robin ThumpUp
The hammocks have been on my mind for some time too, for the same reasons, (crew at battle), but I was thinking more of using actual cloth rolled up. Is there much weight issue with the rolls of Milliput.
Regards
Alan
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Plymouth57
#274 Posted : 26 August 2013 21:52:34

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Hi to all and many thanks for the kind comments! Blushing

Nice acquisition there Mori, there's hardly any difference at all between a 1/98 and a 1/100, so anything useful from the Amati should be perfectly interchangeable, looking forward to seeing some pics of her soon!
Hi Sparks, I just checked the pack of Milliput and it comes out at 4oz so if it took an entire pack it will only add those 4oz to the model. There are 21 hammocks in the poop deck barricade nets and by sheer coincidence I had a further 21 left over which are now rock hard of course. (I'll use them up in the rest of the nets, sticking them in amongst the newly made ones.) I just weighed them as best as I could (using my archery scales) and they came out at half a gram for the whole 21 ! so not much weight there! BigGrin
The groups along the waist will be heavier but they'll have the entire deck structure underneath them, all in all they'll probably weigh less than the copper plating and much less than those big, heavy metal stern galleries!! (why she doesn't sit up and beg I don't know!) LOL
Thanks again Gandale, just to let you see I've still more too much time on my hands, the skylight is composed of 55 separate pieces!!Flapper
Just making up the mizzen mast belaying rack at the moment, be back soon!

Robin
First wooden ship: The Grimsby 12 Gun 'Frigate' by Constructo Second: Bounty DelPrado Part Works Third: HMS Victory DelPrado Part Works 1/100 scale
Diorama of the Battle of the Brandywine from the American Revolutionary War Diorama of the Battle of New Falkland (unfinished sci-fi), Great War Centenary Diorama of the Messines Ridge Assault
Index for the Victory diary is on page 1
Hans
#275 Posted : 27 August 2013 15:47:19

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Another wonderful lesson on modelling. Well done Robin, looks great.
Rgds, Hans
"It's okay to make mistakes. mistakes are our teachers - they help us to to learn, even if it is painfully"
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Plymouth57
#276 Posted : 07 September 2013 22:23:17

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Many thanks for that Hans, much appreciated! Blushing

This is an 'interim' post as the little job I'm doing on her at the moment is proving more 'ambitious' than I originally intended, (damn my super-detailing addiction!)Crying

So rather than take another week to complete it, here's the bits I have done!

This is part one of the continuation of the Poop Deck additions, part 2 (and more to come after that!) has had to wait until today (Saturday 7th September) as I needed to get something from the local Antics store to be able to carry on. More about that in part two.
The first two photos below show the construction of the Mizzen Mast Belaying Rack. This was pretty much the same as the two earlier racks for the Fore and Main Masts with the exception or addition of the curved ‘feet’ on the two posts. In actual life these posts were carved from a single, specially selected section of oak tree trunk with a suitable branch coming out at a right angle, the trunk provided the post and the branch was carved into the foot. This is the only belaying rack which doesn’t pass down through the deck to the deck (or decks) below. It was securely bolted to the Poop deck itself. I chose a slightly easier (actually a lot easier!) method to make mine up, consisting of the two posts which were filed to shape from the Grimsby’s left over hardwood square strip with a slot added to take the wooden belaying pin shelf. The bottom of the posts were also drilled out to take a brass rod and the whole assembly super glued together. Somehow, despite meticulous measuring and marking, when I fitted the posts into their deck drill holes, one of them kept going out of true and leaning over slightly so a little ‘ovalising’ (Hah! Made that one up!) of the holes was necessary to get both posts perfectly upright. Once this was achieved, I then stuck the posts into the deck without gluing them and then used the rotary tool shown in Photo 4 to carve two more pieces of the same square strip to form the feet. This was not as easy as I thought, doing it free hand, the first couple were fine in profile but the ground-away surface was lop-sided! Eventually I did manage to keep the rotary level and made up two suitable feet which were slightly angled to match the slope of the Poop where they were joined to the posts. The result of this is shown in Photo 1. After the glue had dried, I removed the assembly from the deck and painted the whole thing with Admiralty Black with dry brushed white highlights and finally glued it into the deck as in Photo 2.
After the Rack came the Transom Knees. These Knees are essentially strengthening beams which support that part of the stern which projects above the Poop deck, the middle two also providing a support for the Ensign staff (the huge Naval nationality flag which flies at the stern, usually the White Ensign for the Royal Navy but if an Admiral was on board it could also be a red or blue ensign instead). Again these were formed from a single shaped section of tree in real life. The two outer knees were formed simply from hard wood strip, cut to size and angled to fit the slope of the transom at the stern. I don’t think this was from Grimsby, the colour of the wood is different and it definitely didn’t come from the DelPrado! I think it was probably model shop bought some time ago, possibly to improve something on the Grimsby at the time. (Never throw any bits of wood away!) The outer pair should actually have the nice graceful curve at their centres just like the inner two but as these are going to be hidden away behind the flag lockers (part two of this post) there was no point making extra work! Photo 3 shows the outer Knees made up and painted with the first section of the two centre Knees just placed on the deck between them.
Photo 4 carries on the construction of the more authentic inner Knees. The two basic shapes are shown at the bottom of the picture with the same rotary grinding tool as used before placed above another strip of the hardwood . As you can see in the photo, the grinder has been used to cut away a semi circle of the strip just short of cutting right through. When the end of that strip has been sliced off just beyond the middle of the cut and the end sloped to match the angle of the joint on the two strips forming the knees, it becomes the gentle curve of the original shape of the single piece Knee. In the final Photo 5 you can see both of the completed basic Knees. The one on the left has been given a little wood filler to finish off, the right hand one didn’t need any and is just awaiting a final sanding down with fine grade sandpaper. The only reason old lefty needed filler was because the angle of the sloped part which lies flat against the transom was a degree or two out of true when I glued it and I thought it might just move a little with some persuasion – OK so it didn’t! When I glued the two halves back together again, it needed a little bit of filler to keep the curve nice and smooth. (I used to be able to judge when wood was about to snap – must be all the blisters!!)Blushing
In part two I'll show the finished Transom Knees and the story of the Flag Lockers and why I had to go into town to get them finished!

Bye for now and happy bodging to all!

Robin

Plymouth57 attached the following image(s):
Poop deck additions Pt 1 pic.JPG
First wooden ship: The Grimsby 12 Gun 'Frigate' by Constructo Second: Bounty DelPrado Part Works Third: HMS Victory DelPrado Part Works 1/100 scale
Diorama of the Battle of the Brandywine from the American Revolutionary War Diorama of the Battle of New Falkland (unfinished sci-fi), Great War Centenary Diorama of the Messines Ridge Assault
Index for the Victory diary is on page 1
Gandale
#277 Posted : 07 September 2013 22:55:29

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Another excellent lesson in craftsmanship Robin... lovely work.... Drool Love Love Drool Drool

Regards

Alan
sparks
#278 Posted : 09 September 2013 21:56:08

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Nice job Robin ThumpUp
Regards
Alan
England expects that every man will do his duty.
Plymouth57
#279 Posted : 10 September 2013 21:03:27

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Many thanks to the Alans! Read on and you're both 'mentioned in despatches'! BigGrin

OK then, here’s part two of the Flag Locker Saga!

I’ll start off with the shot of the finished Transom Knees from Part One. In the first photo, Photo 6 you can see the finished Knee assembly with the cap for the Ensign glued on top. In this shot the cap has only been painted in Admiralty Black and hasn’t been dry-brushed to bring out it’s angles yet.

And now on to the Flag Lockers! (These are the two large wooden storage lockers situated on the poop deck from where the signal pennants are retrieved to be sent up the halyards. The flags used to spell out Nelson's famous "England expects etc etc" signal would have been taken from here (usually by a young Midshipman). To begin with I had fully intended to build these items out of the grating strips previously used within the decks, but when I checked the old first grating which used to sit on top of the Foc’sl deck I found a problem – using that grating, I would only get a grid of six along and two high giving me only twelve pennant ‘cubicles’ for the locker, which, in reality, has ten cubicles along and four high, a total of forty! Some difference! It was at this point that I decided I’d have a go at trying for the full complement of cubicles by once again going down the same route of the hull entry steps – ‘drastic plastic!’ Not only would it be plastic, it would be the same plastic that I used for those steps. The first step (sorry, unintentional!) therefore was to measure up the dimensions from the McKay drawings and construct a basic frame out of the 0.8 x 2.5mm plastic strip. My ‘cheapo’ guillotine cutter came in very useful here giving a nice right angled cut each time. Once that was done and super glued together (probably the fiddliest part of the whole build) three more strips were cut to fit snugly inside that frame running horizontally from side to side, giving me the four tiers of cubicles. After that came the next most fiddly part, forming the vertical joiners to create the square pennant cubicles. These were so small that it proved impossible to achieve an exact result on the guillotine so I ended up cutting each one by hand with the safety razor blade. It was a slightly hit and miss technique, the tiny bits of plastic had to be large enough to just wedge themselves in the gap between the longitudinal bars but not too loose that they would fall flat inside before they could be glued in position. As it happened, even being ‘just right’ would very slightly push the long strips out of true which meant that the next one above or below it would be correspondingly smaller to fit the thinner gap. The beginning of this procedure can be seen in Photo 7.
The spacers were fed into the gap held by tweezers and once just sitting in position and held firm by their own pressure, secured in place by a cocktail stick applied drop of super in both corners. NOTE! They were only super-glued at the back face of the grid, this kept the face that would eventually be on view much cleaner.
It was at this point, when I had already put some hours of work into the project (time really flies when you’re engrossed in this kind of sub-miniature work!) that a little niggle began to grow in the back of my mind. It was something to do with reading up on the excellent diaries from Gandale and his SOTS, and Sparks and his twin of my DelPrado Victory. Something about wooden gratings it was. I knew that from Sparks diary, he had made his lockers using wooden grating strips but had got far more cubicles into them then I would have using my pack of strips. And as for Gandale, Alan had mentioned more than once that he had replaced the kit 2mm grating material with 1mm to achieve a better result. 2mm grating? 1mm grating? I then got hold of my steel rule and measured my Constructo pack grating – 2mm! 2mm?, then you can get grating packs in ONE MM? The penny suddenly dropped. After all these years of modelling it had never occurred to me that there were finer grating strips available than the ones I had bought in the local model shop! Despite all the references in the various diaries on here I had never looked at gratings on the CMB website. I now realised how Sparks had got a much smaller grid using wooden strip than I was going to get! As I looked at the beginnings of my plastic creation I decided rats to it! In the words of Magnus Magnusson “I’ve started so I’ll finish!”Blushing Cursing
Photo 8 shows the size of these little spacers. Actually, as the grid progressed it became easier and easier to judge the actual size required for the next piece to fit in and, if it was just oversized I just kept it back for the next row, every bit would fit somewhere, even if it wasn’t where initially intended! Although as I said, the longitudinal bars were slightly displaced by the spacers, it was only apparent when looking straight at the grid lying flat on the bench, once it was upright and the point of view was from further above, it wasn’t noticeable at all.
Photo 9 is the completed first locker front standing up approximately in the correct spot, as I said, any irregularity in the grid isn’t that noticeable, (well, it doesn’t stick out like a sore thumb anyway!). Flapper
Now came the reason why I had to wait until my weekly trip into Plymouth last weekend. I had plenty of plastic strip material in my packet to make the grids but I didn’t have the plasticard sheet to make up the rest of the locker body. In actual fact, that’s not exactly true, I do have quite a lot of plasticard in various thicknesses! Unfortunately, all my store is located in my old workroom which was built onto the back of the family garage. There is only one door in and out of that room and to get to it would mean organising a week long expedition to fight my way back through mopeds, garden tools and God knows what else – far easier to wait until Saturday! I was pleasantly surprised at the cost of the sheet though, whilst nearly everything else in the modelling world seems to have gone through the roof since my youth, the 0.8mm A4 sheet was £1.50 from the local Antics. (Talking of going through the roof, the roof of my old workroom is screwed down ‘wriggly tin’ and yes, I did consider it!).
Finally armed with my plasticard, work could resume and the first parts to be added were the side panels as can be seen in Photos 10 and 11. These were carefully shaped not only to fit the curve of the transom but also to slightly slope down back towards the stern. Two reasons for that, firstly the McKay drawing does seem to show a slight slope (so there!) and secondly, the actual front plastic grid was a mm or so higher than intended (I probably didn’t add the thickness of the bottom frame in when I calculated it, but it was far too late by then!) if the locker went back straight and level it would be a little proud of the transom in the outer corners. That little slope took care of that.
The next job was to add the top of the locker on. This was made oversized depth-wise, from the same cut strip as the sides came from as can be seen in Photo 12. Also in that photo is a piece of thin plywood, which has nothing to do with the lockers as such. I think this is the sheet I used to scratch build the internal decks for the stern cabins, the curve on it was cut to match the internal curve of the plywood kit part which the metal decorative stern plate glued onto. That curve exactly matched the inner transom curve (which is probably not surprising as it’s the same piece of wood after all!) The two pencil marks indicate the ends of the locker against the stern so it became a ready made stencil to mark the plastic roof for trimming as you can see.
In Photo 12 both the lockers are made up and resting in position. As you might have noticed in photos 10 and 11, the port locker looks a little incomplete but there’s a very good reason for that as can be seen in the next two photos.
Photos 14 and 15 illustrate the creation of the canvas covers which, during normal sailing conditions covered up the flag lockers to protect the pennants inside. The covers were formed from the Decra-Led strip which I have been using throughout this build. The strip itself is about 8mm in width which is just slightly too thin for the covers. This was rectified by a simple bashing with a flat headed hammer on a piece of steel which not only makes the strip wider by making it thinner (more to a scale thickness in fact) but also imparts a rough texture to the lead which is a pretty good approximation of scale canvas. BigGrin
Two covers were cut from the flattened strip, the one for the port locker was cut to size and the cut out for the knee removed. The cover for the starboard locker was only cut for width, the ‘drop’ didn’t matter as this was going to be the opened locker and the cover would be rolled up on top. This is why I didn’t bother to finish all the spacers in the port locker; apart from a few on the left side, all the others were going to be obscured under the canvas. I might be obsessed with details but if nobody’s going to see all that work then Cursing (EXPLETIVE DELETED)Cursing it! The lead sheet was formed around a largish sewing needle held in the modeller's vice as can be seen in Photo 14. The partially opened sheet was wound around the needle until just the finished cubicles were on view, the other one was wound up completely except for a thin ‘tail’ which was flattened out with the safety razor blade, it would be this flap which would be glued to the top of the locker. On the partially opened canvas, the sheet wasn’t quite wide enough to form the flap so a separate piece of lead was cut and painted and stuck along the top, the actual cover was simply glued to the front of the locker.
The last piece of the plastic locker body is shown in Photo 16. I’d noticed that when peering into the lockers once in position, I could just make out the transom and knees inside which, if the cubicles had gone all the way back as in real life, wouldn’t be possible. There were two possible solutions, paint the inside of the transom and the deck matt black or build a ‘blind’ of some sort to block off the inside. Painting the stern and deck would have been ok, but one little slip of the brush and there would have been loads of quick clean up work to do so I went for option two. I just cut a simple slanting inner wall which runs from the bottom cubicle to just inside the knee position at the top, painted the inside matt black and glued it in. Done!
All that remained then was to give the locker bodies a coat of matt black followed when dry by Admiralty Dull Black so the lockers would match up to the other black items on deck, paint the canvas covers with an undercoat of Admiralty White followed by a couple of coats of ‘off-white’ (Admiralty White plus a tiny drop of Yellow Ochre) to simulate the weathered canvas which was finished off with a little touch of that Humbrol Dark Brown enamel wash for the shadows and a dry-brushing of white to complete. The final result can be seen in Photo 17 in isolation and Photo 18 in position on the deck. They are not glued down yet though, I need to drill the transom for the various cleats and also to add the iron Horse to the middle knees.
I quite enjoyed this little project, despite all the fiddly work, tweezer sprung spacers flying into orbit and the hammering the hell out of my lead sheet! All in all though, I like them a lot!

Happy building to All and my apologies to the two Alans for not reading their diaries close enough. Doh!
Robin
Plymouth57 attached the following image(s):
Poop deck adittions Pt 2 Pic.JPG
Poop deck adittions Pt 3 Pic.JPG
Poop deck adittions Pt 4 pic.JPG
First wooden ship: The Grimsby 12 Gun 'Frigate' by Constructo Second: Bounty DelPrado Part Works Third: HMS Victory DelPrado Part Works 1/100 scale
Diorama of the Battle of the Brandywine from the American Revolutionary War Diorama of the Battle of New Falkland (unfinished sci-fi), Great War Centenary Diorama of the Messines Ridge Assault
Index for the Victory diary is on page 1
stevie_o
#280 Posted : 10 September 2013 21:55:30

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